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tutorials

Synth-Building with Max/MSP #4

This series of tutorials first appeared on my CreativeSynth.com website between 2001 and 2002. Due to their popularity (especially amongst new Max users), I have moved them to the Cycling74.com website.

Synth-Building with Max/MSP #3

This series of tutorials first appeared on my CreativeSynth.com website between 2001 and 2002. Due to their popularity (especially amongst new Max users), I have moved them to the Cycling74.com website.

Synth-Building with Max/MSP #2

This series of tutorials first appeared on my CreativeSynth.com website between 2001 and 2002. Due to their popularity (especially amongst new Max users), I have moved them to the Cycling74.com website.

Synth-Building with Max/MSP #1

This series of tutorials first appeared on my CreativeSynth.com website between 2001 and 2002. Due to their popularity (especially amongst new Max users), I have moved them to the Cycling74.com website.

The Phase Vocoder – Part II

In our last article about the phase vocoder we saw how to create a basic phase vocoder for time-stretching. While it is by no means a simple MSP patch, it is a useful one. In addition to time-stretching, the phase vocoder has been used for transposition and "freeze" effects, which we will be discussing in this article.

My Wii Life…

In this article, Darwin Grosse explains how to use the Wii video-game controller to interface with Max/MSP.

Your First Shader

Typically, when I talk to Jitter users about writing one's own shader programs for use with jit.gl.slab, I usually get glazed-over eyes and this sort of distant look of wonder. When I try to explain how easy it is, that look typically turns to one of annoyed disbelief. So, for a long time now I've been thinking about writing an article to de-mystify the process of writing your own GLSL shaders, and to help everyone avoid some common frustrations.

Getting Around in Radial, Part Three

In the previous installments, I've tried to give you a quick hands-on feel for how radiaL operates, paying particular attention to how you can develop a feel for radiaL's nonlinear playback modes by listening. But I think that the place where radiaL really shines as an instrument rather than enjoyable way to do multi-channel loop manipulation involves the addition of an interface -- connecting radiaL to an external controller in a way that turns your favorite parameter changes into physical/gest...

A Grab Bag of Pluggo Dev Tricks

This folder contains a number of extra externals which we use in the various Pluggo based plug-in packages. These externals are unsupported, contain features which may change at any point, and may not be maintained with regard to backwards compatibility. However, plug-in developers may find some of them useful, and you are free to include and distribute them with your plugs. In this article, I'd like to introduce a few of them, explain a little about how they work, and also demonstrate a couple ...

Making Connections: Connecting a Joystick to MaxMSP/Jitter

Max is all about making connections. The Making Connections series of tutorials will introduce you to new connections you can make between MaxMSP and the outside world. This tutorial, the first in the series, will discuss the use of HID devices such as USB game controllers as gestural interfaces for your Max patches.

Getting Around in Radial, Part 2

In our last installment, I tried to present some really simple and (I hope) explanatory samples of some of the easiest ways to generate and organize variety on the fly using radiaL. One of the things that those examples did that I didn't talk very explicitly about involved loading a single loop on multiple channels and then using radiaL's ability to playback sections of that loop in a nonlinear fashion to create evolving structures. In the interests of "ear training," I suggested that you mute s...

Managing Complex Patches in Max

One of the beauties of Max is its simplicity: the ability to quickly create a patch that does something artistically interesting. Part of this has to do with its visual programming style - patchcords allow us to see the relationship between graphic objects. However, unless you limit yourself to creating only straightforward patches, your patch can become a spaghetti-like series of connections that confound attempts at debugging. Please note: This article was written for Max 4.6 originally

Getting Around in Radial

I've been asked to write a couple of articles that discuss how I learned radiaL, and how I approach using it in a live performance setting -- both as a soloist and in an ensemble setting. While there are a good number of people out there who use radiaL, I'm surprised to discover that there are not nearly as many people who do what I do -- namely, to walk out on a stage, launch the program, and start improvising. While it seems a perfectly natural thing to do from my point of view, it may not nec...

ReWire Essentials, Part Two

In this second installment of the ReWire Essentials series, we are going to look at hosting ReWire client applications. Clients route their information to the host (or mixer) application through the ReWire mechanism, and using Max/MSP as a host gives us options to have some fun with both the playback and output of the connected application.

The Phase Vocoder – Part I

The phase vocoder is a tool used to perform time-stretching and pitch-shifting on recorded sounds. Its name derives from the early "vocoders" (contraction from "voice encoders"), which used a set of bandpass filters in parallel over many frequency bands, to crudely analyze and reconstruct speech. In this article, Richard Dudas and Cort Lippe explain the workings of a phase-vocoder as well as how to construct and modify one in Max/MSP.

Networking: Max talking to Max

Networking is a sometimes confusing world. There are many networking options built into Max, and this article will endeavour to make clear which option is best for your application.

ReWire Essentials 1: From Max/MSP to Your Host

While there are many methods to move MIDI and audio data between programs on a computer, ReWire (developed by Propellerheads) has become the most popular system. It allows a fairly seamless integration of client and host applications, and is also well supported by most major DAW applications. In our tutorial, we will show connections to two major software packages: Ableton Live and Digital Performer.