Forums > Misc

Apple relaxes iOS developer rules – allows third party tools


September 9, 2010 | 3:57 pm

wooot!

so i’m a little confused, though, it says "also… covers apps developed in Adobe Flash CS5". I have an older ipod, back then they couldn’t run any Flash(or to be more specific, I couldn’t view any Flash websites).
Has this changed? Can you view Flash on their newer touch devices?
Or maybe you always could but the built-in web-browser just couldn’t install the Flash plugin so you simply couldn’t view sites using Flash? which is it?
what’s going on?!

*noob is confused*
(hooray for LUA!)
________________________________
*Never fear, Noob4Life was never here!*


September 9, 2010 | 7:03 pm

so i’m a little confused, though, it says "also… covers apps developed in Adobe Flash CS5". I have an older ipod, back then they couldn’t run any Flash(or to be more specific, I couldn’t view any Flash websites).
Has this changed? Can you view Flash on their newer touch devices?

No, in Flash CS5 Adobe added a feature to compile your FLA as a native iOS binary (so that Flash developers could make iOS applications using Flash instead of XCode and Objective-C). This is what the news in the article is about–mentioning game engines and LUA isn’t really news because when Apple originally changed the developer agreement to lock out the Flash CS5 compiler, they quickly backtracked and made another change (in June) allowing interpreted languages as they were being used in game engines already in the store but still prohibiting meta-platforms like Adobe’s compiler. Personally, I agreed with Apple’s stance on this because this would ean any developers using Flash to develop iOS apps would have to rely on Adobe to stay up to date with any of Apple’s API changes and I could be wrong but I’d be surprised to see many high quality apps being made this way. I figured this would probably happen as the FTC and the European Trade Commission have been investigate Apple about this issue (and about excluding the Flash browser plug-in).

I just hope Apple is able to keep the flash plugin out of my iOS devices. Back in the 90s I thought Flash was pretty great, but these days I’m less of a fan. I know that it supposedly has some advantages over HTML5 and friends, but most uses of Flash these days have no reason to be Flash other than it is easy and maybe it is just bad developers, but the only performance and stability problems I ever have with Safari are with Flash (and I hae no quantitative evidence, but the new and improved Flash 10.1 seems to be worse for me at times). I have and do use Flash for some private intranet projects, but I won’t be said if it starts dissapearing from the web.


Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)