Forums > Jitter

big display interface 16X320, (5120ports)

July 8, 2007 | 4:52 pm

hello
maybe this it


July 10, 2007 | 11:04 pm

any hint??


July 11, 2007 | 10:00 am

When I went to burning man in 2004 there was a giant sign at Camp Disorient,
in which were thousands of LED’s controlled individually. I remember a
while back seeing the design for this on the web somewhere. They have
continued to upgrade the sign each year, so it seems from this web link.

http://wiki.disorient.info/index.php?title=Sign

Joshua Goldberg, here on the list, was/is? Quite involved with that camp.
So he might be able to put you in touch with whoever built that aspect of
the sign.

Good Luck

On 7/10/07 4:04 PM, "autogusto" wrote:

>
> any hint??


July 12, 2007 | 6:21 pm

any other?


July 13, 2007 | 8:57 pm

On 12-jul-2007, at 20:21, autogusto wrote:

>
> any other?

you provide little detail about the problem.
and you do not give background about the skills that you have or do
not have to solve this.

do the coils have a mechanical latch function, or do you have to
drive them continuously to turn them on?
if so, you need to provide a digital latch.

take an USB or ethernet driven IO board with plenty of output pins,
like the gluion (http://www.glui.de/).
arrange the coils on a 16×320 matrix, wire 16 pins of the board as a
bus of width 16 along the rows of 16 coils,
and use the other pins ot build a 1 out of 320 selector, which you
use to strobe one out of the 320
rows of coils. you can use D-latches that only respond to the bus
when strobed.
in jitter, render to a 16×320 matrix and read out the cells
columnwise to the 16 bit bus, using the column number as the
address for the 1 out of 320 selector.

If this is all greek to you, I am afraid that you need someone with a
background in electronics to design build and test all this.

beware of the scale of building such a beast.
I once did a 8×128 display with 230V light bulbs, driven by triacs,
and I grossly underestimated the effort
of building 128 units of 8 triacs each, soldering and wiring it all
together, and debugging the wiring errors made by all the friends
that came along to help me out but knew nothing about electronics. we
had a good time though.

good luck
-jennek


July 18, 2007 | 10:30 pm

Quote: Jennek Geels wrote on Fri, 13 July 2007 22:57
—————————————————-
>
> On 12-jul-2007, at 20:21, autogusto wrote:
>
> >
> > any other?

> take an USB or ethernet driven IO board with plenty of output pins,
> like the gluion (http://www.glui.de/).
> arrange the coils on a 16×320 matrix, wire 16 pins of the board as a
> bus of width 16 along the rows of 16 coils,
> and use the other pins ot build a 1 out of 320 selector, which you
> use to strobe one out of the 320
> rows of coils. you can use D-latches that only respond to the bus
> when strobed.

> -jennek
That is definitely the way to go – I typed out a huge reply about a week ago, seems it didn’t get through.

The process described above is often referred to as a scan-matrix or scanning matrix. The "d-latches" are usually simple diodes. As stated the problem is one of scale.

Wiring and soldering a matrix of ANY size can be a hassle… You can drastically reduce the number of required pins by making a more symmetrical matrix, such as 96*96, or in your case 72*72 will give you the outs you need in a matrix, so "just" 144 outputs…
Still, the trick is wiring two cables plus one diode for each coil. That would be (16*320)*3 solder points. if soldering one point takes ten seconds, and prepping cables * 2, drilling hole and mounting the coil each takes ten seconds per coil, then your looking at 16*320*7*10(?) seconds – roughly 100 hours of labour. If you’re a team of people then that’s totally achievable.

Best of luck.
Andreas.


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