Forums > MaxMSP

buffer~

November 11, 2009 | 2:53 pm

Can anybody tell me how long the max. length of buffer~ object is ?
I tried to load a audifole wir 1h50min and got the message "out of menory"

is there a work around to load long audiofiles ?

Thank you
gammon


November 11, 2009 | 5:20 pm

thank you Vanille

sorry, but i dont get your 44100*32*6600 example.

sfplay can play files with 1h50min.

but i would like to "edit" the file with waveform~

I attached my editor:



jml
November 11, 2009 | 5:59 pm

A buffer~ is based on RAM.

Basically, if the buffer size exceeds the amount of free RAM you have available, you won’t be able to load it into your RAM. In such a case (and in general with long files), the recommended method is to use sfplay~.

You should consider that Max is not really meant as a standalone editing platform for audio such as Audacity, Peak, etc.

jml


November 12, 2009 | 10:30 am
Quote:
44100*6600*32 = 9 313 920 000 Bytes = 9.3 GB,

This calculation is correct on OSX v10.6. Otherwise 9 313 920 000 should be divided by 1024 x 1024 x 1024 and you’ll get to a little lower 8.67 GB. In the case of mono.


November 12, 2009 | 11:39 am

Thank you all.
Thanks for the math tutoring.

Of course i know that Max is not Protools.

For the Applikation i´m building it would be very helpfull to have very basic (cut, crop, save file) edit functions for non-audioexperts.

anyway:
I have 4GB of RAM. in my MacBook.
So this should be enough to load a File with 1GB.

If somebody wants to see my (not finished) Applikation, and give me some feedback:
http://www.eigentone.com/RadioRecorder/

btw. why 6600sec. ?

Thank you
best regards
gammon



Ch
November 12, 2009 | 12:15 pm
vanille béchamel wrote on Wed, 11 November 2009 23:39
44100*6600*32 = 9 313 920 000 Bytes = 9.3 GB
(44100 hz , 6600 seconds, 32 Bytes).

I think you meant bit, not byte.
32 bits = 4 bytes


November 12, 2009 | 1:04 pm
Quote:
1024 x 1024 x 1024 ? can you explain ?

Read it here, especially the portion on consumer confusion. Basically a kilo in the binary system is 1024.

And indeed these are bits, not bytes.


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