Forums > MaxMSP

how not to let a bad performance get you down


REC
September 18, 2007 | 10:04 pm

Sorry for the OT post, but i had a horrible show sunday night.. and want to get some support. (although i did use a couple of patches during the show so it’s not too OT). First of all, i found out i was playing the show like 2 hours before hand (i’ve done live shows before, but it’s been years), while my first instinct was to say no way, i thought for a minuter and figured it might be a good thing to throw myself on stage and see what i can come up with.. To be honest, i’ve been doing electronic music for while now… starting with drum and bass back in the late 90′s, alot of things have happened since then.. i’ve lost most of my equipment from those days and had a couple of years of trouble both legally and mentally but the desire to make music has never changed. So i have a ridiculous amount of sounds and songs.. most of which i hate.

Anyway, i play the show using ableton and max… totally improve no set songs just a basic idea of what tracks to play when. As you can imagine it was pretty bad. While, there might have been moments of greatness the overall feeling i got was this is not going well. the show ends, and i do get approched by a couple of people who said they liked it.. but i just laugh (thinking they’re lying). But when asked for my number by a hip hop group..who would like to contact me for some shows.. i thought, hey it might not have been that bad.

playing live has always been my main interest, while i make music for myself, it is nice to let others hear it and hopefully enjoy it. so i learned a lot from this one show. Stage presence is very very important with electronic music… jump around or do something (i didn’t, next time i will). like somebody said before, who wants to watch a guy on stage who looks like he’s reading his email. Secondly, soundcheck (i didn’t) i had no clue what the show sounded like all i heard was popping monitors. third, be well prepared (i wasn’t).

i hope i don’t let this get me to down, but right now i don’t even feel like making music, what do you guys do when you have a horrible show? It actually does inspire me to use max more… because i want to make some sort of realtime manipluation controller… but thats a ways away.

thanks for listening, matt


September 18, 2007 | 10:40 pm

First of all, don’t be so hard on yourself. Crafting
a good performance takes time and practice, there are
no shortcuts. If you have not played a gig in a few
years, I think you can cut yourself some slack.
Now that you have your feet wet again, take this experience
and try it again. Only this time do the things you
mentioned.

Sometimes the hardest critic to satisfy, is the one
inside your head. Most importantly, don’t let that person
stop you from expressing yourself.

Anthony


September 18, 2007 | 11:10 pm

Well, you know I was going to go to that gig, but now….

:-)

Move on to the next one.

best,
Jeff


September 19, 2007 | 12:05 am

It actually sounds like it was an exciting, cool set! I’m betting there were some folks who honestly enjoyed it. And I think most folks hate at least certain parts of their work.
You seem totally committed to your work, I think you ought to keep at it!
Don


September 19, 2007 | 8:02 am

Matthew Williams schrieb:
> i thought for a minuter and figured it might be a good thing to throw
> myself on stage and see what i can come up with..

This is a good starting point, no matter what happens…

> So i have a ridiculous amount of sounds and songs.. most of which i
> hate.

If you know what you hate about it, there is potential to make it better..

> totally improve no set songs just a basic idea of what tracks to play
> when. As you can imagine it was pretty bad.

I imagine it showed that you took a challange, that is much more, than
most musicians I hear, do…

> While, there might have been moments of greatness the overall feeling
> i got was this is not going well.

Oh man, I know that feeling well…, but I also know, that I am mostly
wrong. Focus on those mighty moments of greatness, thats what sticks in
the audience, that’s what makes it worth to hop on stage again…

> the show ends, and i do get approched by a couple of people who said
> they liked it.. but i just laugh (thinking they’re lying).

If its really bad, nobody would come, unless its a personal friend who
doesn’t want to hurt you (good friends would still tell you if its bad
and rather treat your wounds..)

> But when asked for my number by a hip hop group..who would like to
> contact me for some shows.. i thought, hey it might not have been
> that bad.

The most interesting about live music, is listening to sombody who takes
a risk, even if failing, this is much more than just playing a perfectly
produced tape. The whole process of creating music becomes transparent.
I am sure it wasn’t that bad, but you know that it could be much better.
Hop on again, don’t be afraid to fail, it needs practice on stage…

But the best of all: you will get to the point where you can honostly
say to yourself: this was a good show…
It will take some time, and the audience which is following that process
will always appreciate it, as long you keep your own path. Your vision,
what you actually want it to be, is already visible…

> so i learned a lot from this one show.
>
> i hope i don’t let this get me to down,

I hope so too, let me know when you come to Paris or Berlin, I’d like to
hear it live…

> It actually does inspire me to use max more… because i want
> to make some sort of realtime manipluation controller… but thats a
> ways away.

Yeah, that’s what Max is about. While playing you get an idea how you
would want to control your instrument, that will keep you going…

It sounds that thsi night will be a great one if you look back in a
year. The audience seemed to be gratefull, and if it gets you going,
you’ll have quickly a bunch of real fans…

Improvisation is just my favorite concept, its all about surprise, don’t
judge now, judge in some weeks…

Stefan


Stefan Tiedje————x——-
–_____———–|————–
–(_|_ —-|—–|—–()——-
– _|_)—-|—–()————–
———-()——–www.ccmix.com


September 19, 2007 | 8:33 am

Matt,

I can totally relate to you, I found myself some 5 years ago standing
in front of a few hundred in the public doing I don’t know what.
The show I did was however well prepared and although I totally
thought it sucked the public really enjoyed it.

Since then I haven’t made any music worth mentioning, mainly because
I was a bit fed up with the whole way I made music, this is one of
the many reasons I got into max.

Now I am starting to make music again just to play live,
incorporating a whole new and extensive live concept with freaky
instruments on stage and related visuals.

It is true that U are the hardest critic and it’s eventually always
hard to satisfy yourself, but I’m sure that u can find some sorth of
compromise between great sounding music you made and absolutly
awesome cutting edge never to be heard of this is my peak kind of stuff.

pieter

On 19 Sep 2007, at 00:40, apalomba@austin.rr.com wrote:

> First of all, don’t be so hard on yourself. Crafting
> a good performance takes time and practice, there are
> no shortcuts. If you have not played a gig in a few
> years, I think you can cut yourself some slack.
> Now that you have your feet wet again, take this experience
> and try it again. Only this time do the things you
> mentioned.
>
> Sometimes the hardest critic to satisfy, is the one
> inside your head. Most importantly, don’t let that person
> stop you from expressing yourself.
>
>
>
>
> Anthony
>
>
>
>
> —– Original Message —–
> From: Matthew Williams
> Date: Tuesday, September 18, 2007 5:07 pm
> Subject: [maxmsp] how not to let a bad performance get you down
>
>>
>> Sorry for the OT post, but i had a horrible show sunday night..
>> and want to get some support. (although i did use a couple of
>> patches during the show so it’s not too OT). First of all, i found
>> out i was playing the show like 2 hours before hand (i’ve done
>> live shows before, but it’s been years), while my first instinct
>> was to say no way, i thought for a minuter and figured it might
>> be a good thing to throw myself on stage and see what i can come
>> up with.. To be honest, i’ve been doing electronic music for
>> while now… starting with drum and bass back in the late 90′s,
>> alot of things have happened since then.. i’ve lost most of my
>> equipment from those days and had a couple of years of trouble
>> both legally and mentally but the desire to make music has never
>> changed. So i have a ridiculous amount of sounds and songs.. most
>> of which i hate.
>>
>> Anyway, i play the show using ableton and max… totally improve
>> no set songs just a basic idea of what tracks to play when. As
>> you can imagine it was pretty bad. While, there might have been
>> moments of greatness the overall feeling i got was this is not
>> going well. the show ends, and i do get approched by a couple of
>> people who said they liked it.. but i just laugh (thinking they’re
>> lying). But when asked for my number by a hip hop group..who
>> would like to contact me for some shows.. i thought, hey it might
>> not have been that bad.
>>
>> playing live has always been my main interest, while i make music
>> for myself, it is nice to let others hear it and hopefully enjoy
>> it. so i learned a lot from this one show. Stage presence is
>> very very important with electronic music… jump around or do
>> something (i didn’t, next time i will). like somebody said
>> before, who wants to watch a guy on stage who looks like he’s
>> reading his email. Secondly, soundcheck (i didn’t) i had no clue
>> what the show sounded like all i heard was popping monitors.
>> third, be well prepared (i wasn’t).
>>
>> i hope i don’t let this get me to down, but right now i don’t
>> even feel like making music, what do you guys do when you have a
>> horrible show? It actually does inspire me to use max more…
>> because i want to make some sort of realtime manipluation
>> controller… but thats a ways away.
>>
>> thanks for listening, matt
>>
>


September 19, 2007 | 8:39 am

Quote: REC wrote on Wed, 19 September 2007 00:04
—————————————————-
because i want to make some sort of realtime manipluation controller… but thats a ways away.

One thing I learned during my live performances is that you should never let it depend on a new piece of technology (regardless whether it was made by you, a friend or a major company). This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be developing your own technology, it does mean you should start using it live only when it is no longer ‘new’.

Mattijs



REC
September 22, 2007 | 5:19 pm

thank you guys for all the support, it’s been a week now and i’m still a little bummed about the whole deal. But i’ve set my equipment back up at home, and getting back to tghe creating side. I’ve taken everyones comments, and realize it was good to have played reguardless of the sound or impression it left on me.

i do know what i want my patch to do and what kind of controller i want to use witth it. I soooo don’t want to "read email" on stage ever again. I’m going to make my patch so that when i hit a pad or move a slider things will noticably change, so the audience can see what i’m doing and hear it’s effects. i want to "jam"/ improv with my sets. I also just started to read winklers book so i hope that gives me some more ideas for my live show.

basically, the worst thing about this bad show is that i start to question my talent level. then i’ll listen to some old stuff and think "hey that was good". then again i start toi think that i’m getting old and loosing my edge and thus my music is becoming dull and lifeless. but hopefull age plays no role in how your music sounds. i mean it seems like it could only get better as you become a better player. but for some reason i tend to like bands earlier stuff as opposed to the stuff they out out in their later years.. i better stop this tangent here.. i’m depressing myself.. lol

thanks again , matt


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