Forums > MaxMSP

how to make tapin / tapout into a reverb???

October 8, 2006 | 9:31 pm

hey, I was just playing around with tapin / tapout objects. I’ve used them to make a very simple delay, but I was wondering if it is possible to use the same objects to make a reverb?
I would’ve thought this could be achived by lowering the delay time, and raising the feedback, but low delay times tend to give a sound more like a comb filter. Does anyone know how to use the objects to make a reverb?
thanks very much
tom


October 8, 2006 | 10:41 pm

I could be mistaken, but you can make a reverb out of comb filters,
tapin~/tapouts~, filters, etc. Check out the reverb example in the
examples folder. There are combinations of early reflections,
reverberation, dampening, diffusion. I think the example patch would
be a descent starting place. I believe it’s discussed in the Computer
music tutorial (Roads, 1996) as well (no max terminology, though).

Keith

On 10/8/06, register wrote:
>
> hey, I was just playing around with tapin / tapout objects. I’ve used them to make a very simple delay, but I was wondering if it is possible to use the same objects to make a reverb?
> I would’ve thought this could be achived by lowering the delay time, and raising the feedback, but low delay times tend to give a sound more like a comb filter. Does anyone know how to use the objects to make a reverb?
> thanks very much
> tom
>


October 9, 2006 | 1:48 am

hey keith. Thanks a lot, didn’t know there was an example verb… Geez, I didn’t know a reverb was so complicated! I kinda get whats going on in the example reverb, but there are a few things that confuse me… there seems to be no signal going into the ezdac! I check all the subpatches too. Confuses me a little. It’s very impressively thought out!… looks like I got my work cut out…


October 9, 2006 | 2:20 am

the ezdac is just there to turn audio on and off. The signal is going
into p thru2 back into the IO patcher, and that’s where output is.
Those are both supposed to be audio cables coming out, but one doesn’t
show up that way, unless you repatch it. Reverbs are more complex
than you’d think… that’s why I always use externals. Should be fun
for you though…

On 10/8/06, register wrote:
>
> hey keith. Thanks a lot, didn’t know there was an example verb… Geez, I didn’t know a reverb was so complicated! I kinda get whats going on in the example reverb, but there are a few things that confuse me… there seems to be no signal going into the ezdac! I check all the subpatches too. Confuses me a little. It’s very impressively thought out!… looks like I got my work cut out…
>


October 9, 2006 | 7:29 pm

‘that’s why I always use externals’ … I see your point, I downloaded an external called ‘gigaverb’ its very good. It sounds much nicer than my attempt influenced from the example reverb model. I wonder… is there any way to open up an external so I can see it as an open patch? I’d be interested to see whats going on in there…
And I’m suprised… the external sounds much better than my own patch, yet its CPU usage is much lower… some clever stuff is going on in that box


October 9, 2006 | 9:30 pm

Well, I mean, it is a little like an patch inside that external, but
the way it is dealing with data is probably quite different. I do
believe gigaverb has the source code with it, but you would have to
know something about C++ to understand. That external is probably
dealing with information in a more efficient way than your patch.

On 10/9/06, register wrote:
>
> ‘that’s why I always use externals’ … I see your point, I downloaded an external called ‘gigaverb’ its very good. It sounds much nicer than my attempt influenced from the example reverb model. I wonder… is there any way to open up an external so I can see it as an open patch? I’d be interested to see whats going on in there…
> And I’m suprised… the external sounds much better than my own patch, yet its CPU usage is much lower… some clever stuff is going on in that box
>
>


October 10, 2006 | 9:09 am

Quote: Tom Haig wrote on Sun, 08 October 2006 15:31
—————————————————-
> hey, I was just playing around with tapin / tapout objects. I’ve used them to make a very simple delay, but I was wondering if it is possible to use the same objects to make a reverb?
> I would’ve thought this could be achived by lowering the delay time, and raising the feedback, but low delay times tend to give a sound more like a comb filter. Does anyone know how to use the objects to make a reverb?
> thanks very much
> tom
—————————————————-

high level answer:

you can make a reverb out of delays by using delay times
and volumes like they would be in a physical room.

low level answer:

learn more about tapin~ taoput~, it is full of surprisingly
useful features.

there is an example somewhere in your examples folder
about how to make a feedback loop with it, and you should
also try typing a [tapout 50 80 87 101 104 129 144]
and see what happens.

i am not pointing him to yafr or newverb because tapin~
is actually cool to try at first.


October 10, 2006 | 12:08 pm

you could also try cascading a few allpass~ objects, for a different point of view.


October 10, 2006 | 6:27 pm

look inside /examples/effects/reverb maybe is what you’re looking for. You also could simply hack the patch and find some weird and interesting solutions.


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