Forums > MaxMSP

Java programming book recommendations?

January 5, 2008 | 4:31 pm

Hi all,

Wondering if anyone can recommend a good title or two for teaching
myself Java programming?

Thanks,

Steven

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
SFIFEM <
http://sfifem.csf.edu>
Atrium Sound Space <
http://atrium.csf.edu>
OVOS <
http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
CMP <
http://www.csf.edu/csf/academics/cmp/index.html>


January 5, 2008 | 5:50 pm

> Wondering if anyone can recommend a good title or two for teaching
> myself Java programming?

The one I picked up when I was looking into teaching Java was: Head
First Java (O’Reilly). I’ve not spent a lot of time with it, but it
seems both clear and deep. Warning: stupidly long URL follows:

< http://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Java-Kathy-Sierra/dp/0596009208/
ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199555333&sr=8-1>

If it wraps, well, you know what to do…

– N.

Nick Rothwell / Cassiel.com Limited
http://www.cassiel.com
http://www.myspace.com/cassieldotcom
http://www.last.fm/music/cassiel
http://www.reverbnation.com/cassiel
http://www.linkedin.com/in/cassiel
http://www.loadbang.net


January 5, 2008 | 6:35 pm

Thanks Nick, much appreciated. Will check it out.

On Jan 5, 2008, at 10:50 AM, Nick Rothwell wrote:

>> Wondering if anyone can recommend a good title or two for teaching
>> myself Java programming?
>
> The one I picked up when I was looking into teaching Java was: Head
> First Java (O’Reilly). I’ve not spent a lot of time with it, but it
> seems both clear and deep. Warning: stupidly long URL follows:
>
> < http://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Java-Kathy-Sierra/dp/0596009208/
> ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199555333&sr=8-1>
>
> If it wraps, well, you know what to do…
>
>

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
SFIFEM <
http://sfifem.csf.edu>
Atrium Sound Space <
http://atrium.csf.edu>
OVOS <
http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
CMP <
http://www.csf.edu/csf/academics/cmp/index.html>


January 5, 2008 | 6:53 pm

I can second Head First Java. I haven’t finished it but it covers a lot and gives lots of exercises reinforce the lessons.

Quote: nick rothwell / cassiel wrote on Sat, 05 January 2008 09:50
—————————————————-
> > Wondering if anyone can recommend a good title or two for teaching
> > myself Java programming?
>
> The one I picked up when I was looking into teaching Java was: Head
> First Java (O’Reilly). I’ve not spent a lot of time with it, but it
> seems both clear and deep. Warning: stupidly long URL follows:
>
> < http://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Java-Kathy-Sierra/dp/0596009208/
> ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199555333&sr=8-1>
>
> If it wraps, well, you know what to do…
>
> – N.
>
>
> Nick Rothwell / Cassiel.com Limited
>
http://www.cassiel.com
> http://www.myspace.com/cassieldotcom
> http://www.last.fm/music/cassiel
> http://www.reverbnation.com/cassiel
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/cassiel
> http://www.loadbang.net
>
>
>
>
—————————————————-



January 5, 2008 | 10:41 pm

> Oooo… according to Amazon, it’s illustrated!

Yep – that’ll be because of the cartoons. (*)

(I’m being unfair: it has cartoons, diagrams, flowcharts, all sorts
of stuff. It sounds chaotic but, as I said, is pretty clear and easy
to follow.)

(*) I had to pull out my copy to check what "illustrated" might mean
- no easy feat, since I file my technical books vertically. See what
I do for this community?

– N.

nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
http://www.cassiel.com


January 6, 2008 | 6:08 pm

Hi Steven,

I’d recommend "Thinking in Java" from Bruce Eckel.
You can either buy it in hard copy or freely download it from his website – http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

Chris


January 6, 2008 | 9:33 pm

Thanks Chris, I’ll have a look.

On Jan 6, 2008, at 11:08 AM, Chris De Chiara wrote:

>
> Hi Steven,
>
> I’d recommend "Thinking in Java" from Bruce Eckel.
> You can either buy it in hard copy or freely download it from his
> website – http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIJ/

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
SFIFEM <
http://sfifem.csf.edu>
Atrium Sound Space <
http://atrium.csf.edu>
OVOS <
http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
CMP <
http://www.csf.edu/academics/contemporary_music/>


January 7, 2008 | 12:43 am

Steven,

I have used several, and often find that O’Reilly’s texts seem to be the most exhaustive–very helpful as references. I’ve used, as a learning resource, Sams’ Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days–though I’ve found that it’s helpful with this text to be somewhat "oriented" with object-oriented programming (and I don’t mean what Max/MSP considers OOP…)

This book, and several others, are available on Safari, O’Reilly’s online library (http://safari.oreilly.com). A subscription is $30/month, but WELL worth the investment. With such a subscription, you are given full access to a very wide selection of resources (video tutorials, books, articles, etc.) from quite a large number of publishers with coverage spanning myriad technologies. A quick glance shows over 300 Java books available, including the Sams text, as well as the "Head First…" book. This has proven a wonderful investment for me. And, no, I don’t work for O’Reilly. (Now, if only the Roads text was available there!)

Further, I found the texts used in the programming course that is a prerequisite for the masters program at CCRMA to be a wonderful help. Being a graduate student myself (not at Stanford, however), I found this to be a cost-effective way to learn, as well. I was able to find all of the assignments, exercises, etc. available on the Stanford website. They use a sort of "abstracted Java" as an introduction–which works quite well–and then move into the "real stuff." If you’d like information on these resources, feel free to contact me off list.

Best regards,
Brennon


January 7, 2008 | 4:52 am

Hi Brennon,

Thanks for the info, much appreciated. I’ll look into it! I’ll also
follow up off-list for the other materials.
Best,

Steven

On Jan 6, 2008, at 5:43 PM, Brennon wrote:

> I have used several, and often find that O’Reilly’s texts seem to
> be the most exhaustive–very helpful as references. I’ve used, as
> a learning resource, Sams’ Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days–though
> I’ve found that it’s helpful with this text to be somewhat
> "oriented" with object-oriented programming (and I don’t mean what
> Max/MSP considers OOP…)
>
> This book, and several others, are available on Safari, O’Reilly’s
> online library (http://safari.oreilly.com). A subscription is $30/
> month, but WELL worth the investment. With such a subscription,
> you are given full access to a very wide selection of resources
> (video tutorials, books, articles, etc.) from quite a large number
> of publishers with coverage spanning myriad technologies. A quick
> glance shows over 300 Java books available, including the Sams
> text, as well as the "Head First…" book. This has proven a
> wonderful investment for me. And, no, I don’t work for O’Reilly.
> (Now, if only the Roads text was available there!)
>
> Further, I found the texts used in the programming course that is a
> prerequisite for the masters program at CCRMA to be a wonderful
> help. Being a graduate student myself (not at Stanford, however),
> I found this to be a cost-effective way to learn, as well. I was
> able to find all of the assignments, exercises, etc. available on
> the Stanford website. They use a sort of "abstracted Java" as an
> introduction–which works quite well–and then move into the "real
> stuff." If you’d like information on these resources, feel free to
> contact me off list.

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
SFIFEM <
http://sfifem.csf.edu>
Atrium Sound Space <
http://atrium.csf.edu>
OVOS <
http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
CMP <
http://www.csf.edu/academics/contemporary_music/>


January 7, 2008 | 7:41 am

My java tutor at the Open University has mentioned Ian Wiley’s The Java Cookbook. It’s probably good for finageling standard java programming issues, though you won’t find much specifically on midi or dsp.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Java-Cookbook-Ian-F-Darwin/dp/0596007019/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199691207&sr=8-1

You also might try:

http://www.jsresources.org/faq_midi.html

Though I haven’t had a chance to assess this site as yet.

This one should be of interest to anyone thinking of developing java plug-ins!

http://jvstwrapper.sourceforge.net/

Finally, you might want to use the searchable database of the International Computer Music Conference. There’s quite a bit of material on java there.

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/i/icmc/browse.html
> From: smill@csf.edu> Subject: Re: [maxmsp] Re: Java programming book recommendations?> Date: Sun, 6 Jan 2008 21:52:08 -0700> To: maxmsp@cycling74.com> > Hi Brennon,> > Thanks for the info, much appreciated. I’ll look into it! I’ll also > follow up off-list for the other materials.> Best,> > Steven> > On Jan 6, 2008, at 5:43 PM, Brennon wrote:> > > I have used several, and often find that O’Reilly’s texts seem to > > be the most exhaustive–very helpful as references. I’ve used, as > > a learning resource, Sams’ Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days–though > > I’ve found that it’s helpful with this text to be somewhat > > "oriented" with object-oriented programming (and I don’t mean what > > Max/MSP considers OOP…)> >> > This book, and several others, are available on Safari, O’Reilly’s > > online library (http://safari.oreilly.com). A subscription is $30/ > > month, but WELL worth the investment. With such a subscription, > > you are given full access to a very wide selection of resources > > (video tutorials, books, articles, etc.) from quite a large number > > of publishers with coverage spanning myriad technologies. A quick > > glance shows over 300 Java books available, including the Sams > > text, as well as the "Head First…" book. This has proven a > > wonderful investment for me. And, no, I don’t work for O’Reilly. > > (Now, if only the Roads text was available there!)> >> > Further, I found the texts used in the programming course that is a > > prerequisite for the masters program at CCRMA to be a wonderful > > help. Being a graduate student myself (not at Stanford, however), > > I found this to be a cost-effective way to learn, as well. I was > > able to find all of the assignments, exercises, etc. available on > > the Stanford website. They use a sort of "abstracted Java" as an > > introduction–which works quite well–and then move into the "real > > stuff." If you’d like information on these resources, feel free to > > contact me off list.> > —-> Steven M. Miller> Professor, Contemporary Music Program> College of Santa Fe> > Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>> SFIFEM < http://sfifem.csf.edu>> Atrium Sound Space < http://atrium.csf.edu>> OVOS < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>> CMP < http://www.csf.edu/academics/contemporary_music/>> > > > _______________________________________________> maxmsp mailing list> maxmsp@cycling74.com> http://www.cycling74.com/mailman/listinfo/maxmsp
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January 7, 2008 | 6:09 pm

David,

Thank you for the resources, much appreciated!

Best,
Steven

On Jan 7, 2008, at 12:41 AM, David Roden wrote:

>
> My java tutor at the Open University has mentioned Ian Wiley’s The
> Java Cookbook. It’s probably good for finageling standard java
> programming issues, though you won’t find much specifically on midi
> or dsp.
>
> http://www.amazon.co.uk/Java-Cookbook-Ian-F-Darwin/dp/0596007019/
> ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199691207&sr=8-1
>
>
> You also might try:
>
> http://www.jsresources.org/faq_midi.html
>
> Though I haven’t had a chance to assess this site as yet.
>
>
> This one should be of interest to anyone thinking of developing
> java plug-ins!
>
> http://jvstwrapper.sourceforge.net/
>
> Finally, you might want to use the searchable database of the
> International Computer Music Conference. There’s quite a bit of
> material on java there.
>
> http://quod.lib.umich.edu/i/icmc/browse.html

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
SFIFEM <
http://sfifem.csf.edu>
Atrium Sound Space <
http://atrium.csf.edu>
OVOS <
http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
CMP <
http://www.csf.edu/academics/contemporary_music/>


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