simple but complex (for halloween)

Oct 31, 2008 at 11:19pm

simple but complex (for halloween)

i have several samples & synths running all that have different boosts in volumes. Should i use a compressor of some sort to even out the frequencies? Since i am not really sure what it is called that i am looking for (perhaps some would call it a pipe dream), i am having troubles explaining it. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
-chuck

#40596
Nov 1, 2008 at 11:42am

It depends on what’s going on.

Are your sound sources generally around the same volume most of the time, except for some short sections where every once in awhile one source might get a lot louder? If so, then a compressor/limiter would likely be the right tool to use.

Or, is each individual sound source generally a consistent volume, but the volume of each sound source relative to the other sources is not the same (or is unpredictable)? If this is the case, then you’d want to implement something more like an “auto-gain” type of thing that would take a look at the average volume of each source over a long period of time (1+ seconds) and then make adjustments to “normalize” the volume of each sound source to the desired level.

Remember that a compressor will mess with the dynamic range of your audio because it will only reduce the volume of audio events that are louder than a particular threshold. Sounds that are lower than that threshold will not be attenuated. An auto-gain approach will not mess with the dynamic range of the audio because it will change the volume of the entire signal, loud parts and soft parts alike.

#143753
Nov 1, 2008 at 5:13pm

Scott,
The auto-gain type of patch seems to be what i am looking for. i don’t know of any such patches in the help files, if you could point me to it, i would appreciate it. Thanks for the help!
-chuck

________________________________
From: Scott
Sent: Saturday, November 1, 2008 7:42:23 AM
Subject: [maxmsp] Re: simple but complex (for halloween)

It depends on what’s going on.

Are your sound sources generally around the same volume most of the time, except for some short sections where every once in awhile one source might get a lot louder? If so, then a compressor/limiter would likely be the right tool to use.

Or, is each individual sound source generally a consistent volume, but the volume of each sound source relative to the other sources is not the same (or is unpredictable)? If this is the case, then you’d want to implement something more like an “auto-gain” type of thing that would take a look at the average volume of each source over a long period of time (1+ seconds) and then make adjustments to “normalize” the volume of each sound source to the desired level.

Remember that a compressor will mess with the dynamic range of your audio because it will only reduce the volume of audio events that are louder than a particular threshold. Sounds that are lower than that threshold will not be attenuated. An auto-gain approach will not mess with the dynamic range of the audio because it will change the volume of the entire signal, loud parts and soft parts alike.

#143754
Nov 1, 2008 at 5:44pm

Try this:

– Pasted Max Patch, click to expand. –
#143755

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