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Sound Design with MAX 5

November 5, 2008 | 6:17 pm

Hi to all. I want to start creating sounds for sound design using MAX 5. In general I want to create Sound Design for videos using MAX. If anyone has any suggestions or ideas please inform me about it.
For example I want to create a wind sound or a dog’s barging or something like that and I don’t want to download it from the internet. I want to create it by myself.

please help…

Greetings,

panos



Aly
November 5, 2008 | 6:47 pm


November 5, 2008 | 7:16 pm

Hello Panos, to be honest:

Using Max/msp for the sounds you mentioned seems a bit like trying to drive a screw with a laser gun,

I would recommend getting a classy but cheap digital recorder, like a Zoom H2, and record those sounds yourself in up to 4 channel/24bit/48 KHZ yourself, whereever you find any.
Building a database of real-life sounds out of that spares you a LOAD of initial programming work – and it guarantess you are using the most natural and original sounds at the same time.
Personally i can see no reason to fake those things with max/msp or a similar tool. It woudl just always sound more computed/unnatural/electronic etc.

max/msp will still be a good source of alteration to those natural recordings, but you won;t have to create everything from scratch.

jrp


November 5, 2008 | 9:08 pm

Have you gone through the MSP Tutorials? The chapters on synthesis might be helpful if you want to experiment with making new sounds. For "natural" sounds, though, you’re better off just recording them, as the others have said. But you could also play your recorded sounds with sfplay~, etc. and do further processing within Max.


November 5, 2008 | 10:42 pm

Although I wonder what a movie would be like if all of the sound effects were computer-generated instead of recorded. Especially if someone did a really good job on it. I bet it would be very interesting.


November 5, 2008 | 10:49 pm

If you really want to digitally generate common sound effects, your best bet is going to be studying up on all the different common audio synthesis techniques, and play around with them extensively to get a feel for what sounds they’re best suited to create. Then you’d know that granular synthesis is better for generating a dog bark sound than additive synthesis.

If you’re starting from scratch with little or no knowledge of synthesis techniques, then I hope the film you’re creating sounds for doesn’t have a deadline anytime soon. You’re in for a LOT of work, and it’s going to take awhile. Don’t expect immediate results. Generating semi-realistic sound effects is an art of sorts, and not one that is quickly mastered.


November 5, 2008 | 11:14 pm

may i suggest looking up:http://www.obiwannabe.co.uk/
andy farnell is a guy who put a lot of effort and knowledge into
making something like that in pure data.

hans
http://www.hans-w-koch.net

Am 05.11.2008 um 23:42 schrieb Scott:

>
> Although I wonder what a movie would be like if all of the sound
> effects were computer-generated instead of recorded. Especially if
> someone did a really good job on it. I bet it would be very
> interesting.


November 6, 2008 | 2:57 am

There is certainly a place for audio synthesis in film sound track; I’ve found that particularly in atmospherics &/or or buzz track, having completely artificial wind sounds, or other continuous backgrounds (like air conditioning hum) gives you enormous control of the mood of a scene, working almost at a subconscious level. This type of texture is relatively easy to do, and often is less time consuming than going out and recording buzz tracks, which can be either ruined by a dog-bark (or lawnmower aircraft flying overhead etc) or the not-quite-right sound of a particular location.

For wind, surf, traffic rumble etc a good place to start is dynamically filtered white/pink/brown noise, with randomly controllable centre freqs and bandwidths.

If you’re new to sound synthesis then filtered noise (subtractive synthesis) is a very good place to start. Its a simple concept, but it can create an enormous range of sounds; it can also be further extended conceptually to include any synthesis method ie formant synthesis, pm etc. (JO Smith: "everything is a filter")

Lay up your sound track completely with atmospheric textures, and the rest (maybe even the music) will fall into place.

I’d post a patch but over the past few years I’ve used sc instead of max for that kind of application. Granular textures are also v good for atmos.
tm


November 7, 2008 | 5:52 pm

Scott schrieb:
> Although I wonder what a movie would be like if all of the sound
> effects were computer-generated instead of recorded. Especially if
> someone did a really good job on it. I bet it would be very
> interesting.

Hitchcocks birds have been entirely done with a Trautonium + some
external effects by Oskar Sala, all synthesized…

Stefan


Stefan Tiedje————x——-
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November 7, 2008 | 6:53 pm

>Hitchcocks birds have been entirely done with a Trautonium + some

> external effects by Oskar Sala, all synthesized…

…and definately without any digital limits (infinite bit plus infinite sample rate) as well as including the pleasant degradation of magneto-optical film sound.

loveable! jrp


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