Forums > MaxMSP

Stuff in london

July 12, 2006 | 12:58 pm

Hi there,

I’m visitng london for 10 days or so and figured id take the spare time I have to look for digital work created in MAXSP/JITTER or similar programs. I’ve looked for galleries that are exhibiting work of a digital/sound/visuals nature to not much success. They must exist or am I looking for the wrong thing?

I’d really like to make full use of this time so if anyone could point me in the direction of any work of a digital/sound/visuals nature i’d be very gratefull. I dont care wether its a gallery, a night club an alternative space a warehouse or whatever I just want to be exposed to something in person instead of on the internet.

Thanks in advance

Richard


July 12, 2006 | 2:14 pm

On 12 Jul 2006, at 14:58, Richard Powell wrote:

> I’ve looked for galleries that are exhibiting work of a digital/
> sound/visuals nature to not much success. They must exist or am I
> looking for the wrong thing?

There’s not a great deal of that about (to my knowledge) outside
particular festivals.

> I’d really like to make full use of this time so if anyone could
> point me in the direction of any work of a digital/sound/visuals
> nature i’d be very gratefull.

It depends when you’ll be in town – what dates? I’m currently doing a
few odds and ends in London (well, *currently* in Brussels, but
almost currently in London).

– N.

nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
http://www.cassiel.com


July 12, 2006 | 2:20 pm

thanks,

I’ll be in london 14th July > 18th July and 21 July > 24th July. Short notice i know

I’ve looked at your website and I’d definately be interested in seeing some of it but I cant seem to see something in London for those dates.

Anything else?


July 12, 2006 | 3:56 pm

Nope – I’m in Brussels for the first set of dates and at ZKM for the
second…

Maybe check out some of the LMC stuff: http://www.l-m-c.org.uk/
calendar.html

– N.

nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
http://www.cassiel.com


July 12, 2006 | 5:27 pm

There’s a Colourscape in Croyden (South London) that weekend. I think
Lawrence Casserley is playing, and he uses max/msp (and he has a
really cool new external skeleton thingy sensor controller too!)

should be more details on http://www.colourscape.org.uk or via
Lawrence’s site – http://www.chiltern.demon.co.uk/Colourscape.html

David


July 12, 2006 | 5:41 pm

Aw, tell me it’s not a GypsyMIDI…

– N.

nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
http://www.cassiel.com


July 12, 2006 | 6:30 pm

It’s something that sits on his shoulders, and has arms along his
arms (not sure what else to call them – the arms, that is, not his
arms), (hmm, time to open another beer) and flexs at shoulder,
elbow, and wrist joints.
It’s pretty cool (the controller thing – well, actually the beer is
pretty cool too. i think I’ll go now …).

David


July 12, 2006 | 7:54 pm

Sounds like a GypsyMIDI to me. I just reviewed it for Sound On Sound…

nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
http://www.cassiel.com


July 12, 2006 | 10:01 pm

I particularly enjoy their demo videos.
Does it come with the tight black shirt?

;)

Andrew B.


July 13, 2006 | 12:10 am

hey thanks everyone

I’ll definately check out the colourscape thing, sounds interesting

Still open to suggestions though

Anythign else?


July 13, 2006 | 5:08 pm

Just catching up on the Max list since I got back from Germany on
Monday.

Yes – it is Gypsy MIDI – I’ll be interested to see what you thought
of it. The really great thing for me is that, with the radio MIDI
option, it frees me up to move around Colourscape with other
performers while doing my processing, rather than always being glued
to my computer and control devices. This has been a dream ever since
I first worked in Colourscape in 1989. A few years back Sukandar
Katardinata made a radio control device for me, which went part of
the way, but there were a lot of limitations.

GM has limitations too, but it’s very early days yet, and I’m
learning slowly how to use it with my system. In principle, it is
working well, though. I can also see that it wouldn’t "suit" a lot of
people/situations, and I don’t think I want to use it in conventional
"stage" performances, but as a solution to the Colourscape dilemma it
seems to be pretty good. The big thing is mapping appropriate
gestures to sound actions – I have made a good start, but still much
to be done. It also seems to work well for an audience, who appear to
get a good sense of what I am doing to the sound a lot of the time –
but, as I say, still much to be done.

Best

L

Lawrence Casserley – lawrence@lcasserley.co.uk
Lawrence Electronic Operations – http://www.lcasserley.co.uk
Colourscape Music Festivals – http://www.colourscape.org.uk


July 13, 2006 | 5:25 pm

Sounds like fun.

Its sods law unfortunately that I doubt I’ll be able to make it. It is a real shame as it sounds really interesting. The course I’m doing (in Maxsp) on the saturday and sunday doesnt finish untill 5.30 so doesnt look hopefull. I’ll definately still try though. If not… another time

Richard


July 17, 2006 | 3:22 pm

On 16 Jul 2006, at 20:13, Nick Rothwell wrote:

>
> On 13 Jul 2006, at 18:08, lawrence casserley wrote:
>
>> Yes – it is Gypsy MIDI – I’ll be interested to see what you
>> thought of it.
>
> Well, for all the gory details, you’ll have to check the SOS
> article – they wanted 2500 words so it’s pretty intensive – but I
> can tell you my main concerns with it:

I’ll look forward to seeing it.
>
> 1. build quality: the review unit I had was missing a bolt, and one
> of the potentiometer mounts came off while we were testing it

This weekend, on its fifth outing, one of my pots came loose (ie the
pot shaft separated from the bit that turns it) – regular tightening
up is to be recommended, I think – not helped by the fact that two
different allen keys are required. My biggest complaint is that all
those velcro fixings stick to each other when you are trying to put
it on! It will be interesting to find out how well it holds up after
months on the road.
>
> 2. resolution: 128 MIDI controller values in something like a 270
> degree rotation means that you get a lot less resolution when a
> joint has been calibrated for the amount of movement it’ll actually
> receive

Yes – this can be tricky to sort out, and it influences which
movements get assigned to which parameters. Another issue is the
amount of interaction you get between some movements, but I guess
that’s partly a matter of playing technique, which I have to learn to
deal with myself.
>
> 3. repeatability: when you can’t touch, or even see, any
> controllers, it’s hard to judge and repeat particular settings,
> especially for a device based on rotation rather than absolute
> position

I don’t have a big issue with that – again it’s partly a matter of
playing technique – more like playing a violin than a piano – and
careful assigning of parameters helps. I also like situations where I
have to "feel" the behaviour of the instrument – this is typical of
my setup anyway. My initial trial uses a downward flick of the wrist
to trigger a sound (speed of flick controls velocity), left-to-right
hand position to select the pitch, and elbow height to control the
length of the sound – this seems to be quite controllable, and I am
getting the hang of it quite well now – I did a very successful duet
processing Michael Ormiston’s voice yesterday. The thing that doesn’t
work so well, is that I assigned a sideways flick of the wrist to
change pitch range settings, but I get too much interaction between
that and the note trigger, so it is very easy to change ranges
accidentally. There is provision for two additional sensors on each
arm, so I am thinking about adding some pushbuttons for this. I still
have some unassigned movements as well.
>
> I found the bundled software a little rough and untidy – but then I
> expect you’d be rolling your own, in which case issues 2 and 3
> might not be that major.

Yes, it was useful at first, just to work out what was doing what –
but I abandoned it pretty quickly to make my own interface, which
works much better, and is easier to tweak. In this sense it is a
perfect fit with Max, because you can map those outputs to whatever
you want. It would be more difficult with other software, but I guess
that’s why they made a Max program to do the mapping.

Yes, there are some drawbacks, but I am finding it an interesting and
worthwhile experience.

Anyone else tried one?
>
> – N.
>
>
> nick rothwell — composition, systems, performance — http://
> http://www.cassiel.com
>
>
>

Lawrence Casserley – lawrence@lcasserley.co.uk
Lawrence Electronic Operations – http://www.lcasserley.co.uk
Colourscape Music Festivals – http://www.colourscape.org.uk


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