Forums > MaxMSP

Understanding number~

January 12, 2008 | 6:21 pm

I’m just learning Max/MSP and am creating a series of simple but practical patch exercises to make it a little more fun for me as I go. Presently I am trying to create a patch that generates a simple slap-back delay on an incoming signal. I am trying to create a volume ramp on the slap-back so that the "echo" sounds like a "volume swell" – akin to a sound commonly used by electric guitarists. In principle, I think I have a working patch, but it is erratic and my problem seems to stem from the way I am using number~ as an incoming signal monitor and to trigger the ramp on the slap-back. Could someone tell me exactly what number~ monitors when it receives a signal? If I send signal directly from an adc~ to number~ the "monitoring" is extremely erratic and often drops into the negative when a hot signal is introduced. So it seems to me that it is not monitoring amplitude. Is is it somehow tracking and converting frequency information?

Please excuse the novice question and thank you to anyone who takes the time to reply.

Cheers,
Steve


January 12, 2008 | 6:47 pm

On 12 janv. 08, at 19:21, Stephen Griesgraber wrote:

> I’m just learning Max/MSP and am creating a series of simple but
> practical patch exercises to make it a little more fun for me as I
> go. Presently I am trying to create a patch that generates a simple
> slap-back delay on an incoming signal. I am trying to create a
> volume ramp on the slap-back so that the "echo" sounds like a
> "volume swell" – akin to a sound commonly used by electric
> guitarists. In principle, I think I have a working patch, but it is
> erratic and my problem seems to stem from the way I am using number~
> as an incoming signal monitor and to trigger the ramp on the slap-
> back. Could someone tell me exactly what number~ monitors when it
> receives a signal? If I send signal directly from an adc~ to
> number~ the "monitoring" is extremely erratic and often drops into
> the negative when a hot signal is introduced. So it seems to me
> that it is not monitoring amplitude. Is is it somehow tracking and
> converting frequency information?

Number~ display the samples values, that’s why you see negative values
sometimes. If you want to have an idea of the real amplitude you may
have a look to envelope follower techniques (via peakamp~, slide~ and
co).

Cheers,
ej


January 12, 2008 | 7:02 pm

I’m precisely in this step of the learning curve, following the tutorials…

i don’t know if you have jitter, but tutorial #28 "Audio Control" uses exactly the process you describe (for controlling video, based on peakamp~)

Maybe you should have a look, think it can be useful

Philippe


January 12, 2008 | 7:14 pm

remember that peakamp~ and snapshot~ are, relatively, quite cpu-
intensive. if you’re using jitter, only trigger their output when you
need a new frame to be drawn.

On Jan 12, 2008, at 2:02 PM, Philippe Jelli wrote:

>
> I’m precisely in this step of the learning curve, following the
> tutorials…
>
> i don’t know if you have jitter, but tutorial #28 "Audio Control"
> uses exactly the process you describe (for controlling video, based
> on peakamp~)
>
> Maybe you should have a look, think it can be useful
>
> Philippe
>


January 12, 2008 | 7:49 pm

avg~ is handy for envelope following.

On 12/01/2008, joshua goldberg wrote:
>
> remember that peakamp~ and snapshot~ are, relatively, quite cpu-
> intensive. if you’re using jitter, only trigger their output when you
> need a new frame to be drawn.
>
> On Jan 12, 2008, at 2:02 PM, Philippe Jelli wrote:
>
> >
> > I’m precisely in this step of the learning curve, following the
> > tutorials…
> >
> > i don’t know if you have jitter, but tutorial #28 "Audio Control"
> > uses exactly the process you describe (for controlling video, based
> > on peakamp~)
> >
> > Maybe you should have a look, think it can be useful
> >
> > Philippe
> >
>
>


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