unusual sequencers.

Oct 8, 2007 at 11:15pm

unusual sequencers.

Hi all,

i’m building a series of odd sequencing devices – some generative, some
more arpeggiator-like, and some downright weird.

Right now I am running Game of Life among other things, and also mashing
up jitter matrices (hence my other post in the jitter list)

I was wondering if any of you would like to share some of your favourite
sequencing tricks? I’m not talking simple step sequences here, but the
esoteric and odd. Either as patches or simply explained would be wonderful.

I will be making some non-Jitter sequence logic units soon and upload
them here.
All the best,
Andreas.

#34042
Oct 9, 2007 at 12:08am

Check out Hans Christoph-Steiner’s Solitude, composed using
PureData’s data structures, a graphical notation format. http://
at.or.at/hans/solitude/

#114371
Oct 9, 2007 at 12:16am

http://faculty.roosevelt.edu/malone/downloads.htm
click Abstractions
some of my favorite patterns to apply to sequences
also some pieces using them on the same page

#114372
Oct 9, 2007 at 2:46am

A while back I described some of the stuff I was working on:

http://www.cycling74.com/forums/index.php?t=msg&goto=110351#msg_110228

This modular sequencing approach has been good for exploring polyrhythms, Steve Reich-like phasing patterns, and total serialism.

One thing I didn’t think about back then was intermixing commands and data. I’ve experimented with sequencing a list of commands that manipulate another sequencer’s contents (modifying the loop as it plays by inserting, deleting, rotating, reversing, etc). Chaining sequencers in this way seems like a really interesting way to produce complex patterns from a few simple patterns and I plan on exploring this a lot more in future.

One thing I’ve thought of but haven’t tried yet is to sequence chunks of interpreted code like javascript. One application of this might be to write some generators for the sequenced data in scripts, and modify those scripts as the program runs.

Separate from all that I’ve also had fun with cellular automata. Even simple 1-dimensional automata can make some nice note patterns, especially if you modify the state/rules on the fly. With 2-D and higher I’ve had some trouble finding good mappings to the music, but I haven’t put much thought into it yet. How are you mapping things?

Adam

#114373
Oct 9, 2007 at 3:10am

This reminds me of a project Joel Chadabe did back in the ’70s with
numerous interconnected analog sequencers on a Moog analog modular
system. See the pic at < http://emfinstitute.emf.org/exhibits/cems.html>.

On Oct 8, 2007, at 8:46 PM, Adam Murray wrote:

>
> A while back I described some of the stuff I was working on:
>
>
http://www.cycling74.com/forums/index.php?t=msg&goto=110351#msg_110228
>
> This modular sequencing approach has been good for exploring
> polyrhythms, Steve Reich-like phasing patterns, and total serialism.
>
> One thing I didn’t think about back then was intermixing commands
> and data. I’ve experimented with sequencing a list of commands that
> manipulate another sequencer’s contents (modifying the loop as it
> plays by inserting, deleting, rotating, reversing, etc). Chaining
> sequencers in this way seems like a really interesting way to
> produce complex patterns from a few simple patterns and I plan on
> exploring this a lot more in future.
>
> One thing I’ve thought of but haven’t tried yet is to sequence
> chunks of interpreted code like javascript. One application of this
> might be to write some generators for the sequenced data in
> scripts, and modify those scripts as the program runs.
>
> Separate from all that I’ve also had fun with cellular automata.
> Even simple 1-dimensional automata can make some nice note
> patterns, especially if you modify the state/rules on the fly. With
> 2-D and higher I’ve had some trouble finding good mappings to the
> music, but I haven’t put much thought into it yet. How are you
> mapping things?
>
> Adam

—-
Steven M. Miller
Professor, Contemporary Music Program
College of Santa Fe

Home < http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill>
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http://sfifem.csf.edu>
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http://atrium.csf.edu>
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http://pubweb.csf.edu/~smill/ovos.html>
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http://www.csf.edu/csf/academics/cmp/index.html>

#114374
Oct 9, 2007 at 7:08am

#114375

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