video control through basic stamp

Oct 27, 2006 at 2:55am

video control through basic stamp

hi,

i want to call up a number of video clips using simple momentary switches. i would like to have these clips layer on top of each other – basically, when a button is pressed, it calls up a clip. when the button is not pressed, the clip stops. however many buttons are pressed, those corresponding clips are played and layered on top of each other.

does anyone have a patch for playing video through a basic stamp?
or the pbasic code for sending digital info to Max would be awesome.

i have never really worked with Jitter or Max, so if this is a stupid inquiry, i’m sorry.

help appreciated.
-J

#28387
Oct 27, 2006 at 7:05am

you can try sending midi messages to max
google [ "basic stamp" midi]
this came up

http://peabody.sapp.org/class/dmp2/lab/cout/

On 10/27/06, Jami wrote:
>
>
> hi,
>
> i want to call up a number of video clips using simple momentary switches.
> i would like to have these clips layer on top of each other – basically,
> when a button is pressed, it calls up a clip. when the button is not
> pressed, the clip stops. however many buttons are pressed, those
> corresponding clips are played and layered on top of each other.
>
> does anyone have a patch for playing video through a basic stamp?
> or the pbasic code for sending digital info to Max would be awesome.
>
> i have never really worked with Jitter or Max, so if this is a stupid
> inquiry, i’m sorry.
>
>
> help appreciated.
> -J
>

#87060
Oct 27, 2006 at 3:29pm

I’ve done similar things with a Crumb-Board (also a programmable dsp). MIDI works well as the protocol because of the way it is treated by other programs, the operating system, etc. You could also just use the serial-object in Max to either recieve RS-232 messages or (if your board has one) messages from the USB-COMport. If, however, you are only thinking about using a basic-stamp because it seems to be the only way of connecting switches to your computer, you could more easily hack a USB-Joystick. This gives you something like 12 individual switches (although I am not sure if eight of them may be mutually exclusive; I’ve never tried it. At the least, you should get 5 switches which work independantly of each other.) The HI-object is what you need for this.
As for the program, I’ll let you figure it out.

have fun

#87061
Oct 28, 2006 at 9:52pm

thanks. i actually got ahold of an ardunio chip and some coding to use that.

#87062

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