Thanks for your help. We've received your bug report.

‘graphic’

Jitter Recipes: Book 3, Recipes 26-43

In third installment of Jitter Recipe Collection, the Jitter Recipe “AnaglyphRender” builds on the “RenderMaster” recipe posted to create a realtime 3-D anaglyph image.

A Video and Text Interview with Alex Stahl

Alex Stahl is a veteran collaborator and this has never been more evident than in his collaboration with Composer Paul Dresher for the opera Schick Machine. As Robert Henke pointed out in the recent Max/MSP/Jitter Conference, Expo '74, many of us spend years working on the same Max patch. Alex Stahl has spent years developing the Max/MSP patches that are at the core of Schick Machine. Along the way he's developed skills that landed him a fascinating job at Pixar Studios. Collaboration can be qui...

An Interview with Noriko Matsumoto

An amazing artist with an amazing range of work, read the interview of Noriko Matsumoto by Greg Taylor.

The Video Processing System, Part 3

In this installment, we'll be working on some more advanced ninja tricks - creating the beginnings of a control/preset structure with assignable LFOs, and building a GPU-based video delay effect. These two parts will bring our system to a much more usable level, and allow for much more complex and interesting results. Ironically, most of what we are really doing in this installment is just an extension of bread-and-butter Max message passing stuff.

An Interview with Keith McMillen

Keith McMillen Instruments recently impressed all of us at NAMM with demonstrations of a new pair of string performance devices, the K-Bow and StringPort, both of which include some very rich software applications written in MaxMSP. The K-Bow, a bluetooth-based wireless gestural controller integrated into a violin bow, has just started shipping so we thought it would be a good time to catch up with Keith and find out more about the project. I met Keith at his studio...

The Video Processing System, Part 2

In our last article, we began to create our processing system by putting the essential structure in place and adding our input handling stage. In this installment we are going to be adding a gaussian blur and color tweaking controls to our patch.

The 2009 NAMM Show

I recently attended Winter NAMM 2009 in Anaheim,CA, where Cycling '74 was sharing booth space with our friends at Ableton. I arrived on Friday afternoon, well after we had released our product announcement for Max for Live, and was impressed by the volume of booth traffic we were getting. Ableton had, of course, also announced their new Akai controller and Live 8 in addition to Max for Live, so there was a great deal of buzz surrounding our area of the show...

An Interview with Dana Karwas

When you think of multimedia technology you think mostly about the technology. When you experience Dana Karwas' work you think of the rich organic layers of experience. Dana is working in the nebulous grey area between art and design. As a trained architect she is commissioned to do design works for giants such as Knoll, yet as an artist she creates amazingly tactile and organic performances like her work Party Dress and the installation Fursicle. Although based in architecture, Dana’s work us...

An Interview with Mattijs Kneppers

These days it seems that everyone wants to be an artist so I found it refreshing to meet someone who see himself as an engineer that wanted to create tools for artists. Mattijs Kneppers spoke to me by phone from his home in Holland.

Announcing Expo ’74

Cycling '74 today announced that its first user conference, Expo '74, will be held in San Francisco next April. The conference will include presentations, installations, workshops, and collaborative events covering the company's Max/MSP/Jitter software. Details will be outlined on the conference web site (expo74.net) in the coming months.

Announcing Expo ’74: Our First User Conference

I'm pleased to announce that Cycling '74 will be hosting its first user conference next year, Expo '74. The conference will run three days from April 22-24, 2009 and will be held at the new (and intensely colored) Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I'd like to tell you why we decided to put on this event and what you can expect to happen if you attend...

Siggraph 2008

Last week, Siggraph 2008 took over the Los Angeles Convention Center, and Cycling '74 was there to bravely represent Jitter to a huge crowd of CG enthusiasts, production professionals, and academics. For anyone who hasn't been to a Siggraph show, it is a huge, over-stimulating event for the computer graphics community, complete with academic talks, screenings, an exhibition hall, an art show, competitions, and a job fair.

Create Your Own Default Workspace in Max 5

In addition to an unprecedented number of configurable settings, Max 5 also provides a more navigable structure for making choices about your environment. In this article we'll discuss ways you can tweak the settings in various places to make your time spent in Max 5 more comfortable and fulfilling to your aesthetic requirements.

Freshening Up, Part 2

When we left off in the last article, we had created a new color scheme and layout for our old patcher using presentation mode, translucency, improved color controls, and embedded hints. We could certainly leave this patch alone, but we're going to take the interface to another level, making it a little more interactive and interesting, while providing more intuitive controls. The techniques discussed here should open the door to much more fun and useful interface designs for your patches.

Freshening Up: Giving old patchers a new face in Max 5

I have to confess that I always found UI design in Max 4 to be a little too cumbersome, and would almost always wait until a patch was completely written and debugged before bothering with any layout of UI elements and color. The design process was usually confounded in the end by the fact that [...]

Cycling ’74 Releases Max/MSP Version 5

Cycling ’74 today released Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity...

The Adaptive Use Instruments Project

Recently I bumped into composer and performer Pauline Oliveros (PO) in San Diego. We got to talking about one of her current projects, the Adaptive Use Musical Instruments for the Physically Challenged. This project introduces software designed to be used in therapy sessions to give children with limited motor skills the opportunity to participate in music, and offer them an outlet for musical expression. I arranged for a follow-up interview by email so that we could learn more about what this p...

Announcing Max/MSP Version 5

Cycling '74 today announced Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.

Your First Shader

Typically, when I talk to Jitter users about writing one's own shader programs for use with jit.gl.slab, I usually get glazed-over eyes and this sort of distant look of wonder. When I try to explain how easy it is, that look typically turns to one of annoyed disbelief. So, for a long time now I've been thinking about writing an article to de-mystify the process of writing your own GLSL shaders, and to help everyone avoid some common frustrations.

A Video Interview with Matthew Lewis, Graphics Research Specialist

Matthew Lewis: Education through synesthetic study and play.

Jitter Recipes: Book 2, Recipes 14-25

The majority of these recipes are specific implementations of a more general patching concept. As with any collection of recipes, you will want to take these basic techniques and personalize them for your own uses.

Jitter Recipes: Book 1, Recipes 0-12

Book 1 contains some clever solutions, advanced trans-coding techniques, groovy audio/visual toys, and basic building blocks for more complex processing.

Xray.jit objects released

Xray.jit objects have been released. These are divided into several broad categories pertaining to Geometry, Data, Video, and Simulation. The Geometry objects deal more with OpenGL situations. The Data objects operate on jitter matrices without consideration for what that data necessarily represents and are more geared toward the general matrix format. The Video objects on the other hand mostly deal with data that is in one of the common video formats such as 1 plane char or 4 plane char. Finall...

A Video Interview with David Tinapple, Video Artist

On visual programming for visual media. Watch David's video.