Thanks for your help. We've received your bug report.

‘software’

An Interview with Giorgio Sancristoforo

Giorgio Sancristoforo is a very enthusiastic artist, musician, audio engineer and software developer based in Milan, Italy. Giorgio incorporates Max/MSP into all his projects whether they are his interesting audio applications that sell for a modest price or his more artistic projects such as sound design for a large-scale composition culled from the sounds of [...]

Max for Live Presentation at Expo ’74

In this presentation, I spoke directly to people that were already familiar with Max, explained some of the details of working within the Live environment, and provided some tips about how to design an effective Live device. Hopefully this will whet your appetite for working with the Max/Live combo!

An Interview with Noriko Matsumoto

An amazing artist with an amazing range of work, read the interview of Noriko Matsumoto by Greg Taylor.

Max for Live: A Sneak Peak at the Live API features

So far we have talked about how Max for Live will allow you to create your own custom Max devices that run inside of Ableton Live. Most of the examples you've seen so far have been pretty similar to your average plugin, with the fundamental difference of being to edit the device in place. That in itself is pretty spectacular, and probably enough to please a lot of people and keep everyone busy. Well now I'd like to talk about a couple of features that really make Max for Live unique and pretty e...

A Look Back at NIME 2009

I will try to summarize here what I thought were some of the highlights of NIME 2009...

Pluggo Technology Moves to Max for Live

Effective immediately, Cycling ’74 will discontinue sales of prebuilt Max-based audio plug-in packages. This includes Pluggo, Mode, Hipno, and UpMix. We will still continue to support current users as best we can, but there will be no further development on either the plug-in packages or their supporting technology.

A Look Back at Expo ’74

Last week, we put on our first conference. Now that Expo '74 is history, I've been asked to share my thoughts about the experience...

An Interview with Keith McMillen

Keith McMillen Instruments recently impressed all of us at NAMM with demonstrations of a new pair of string performance devices, the K-Bow and StringPort, both of which include some very rich software applications written in MaxMSP. The K-Bow, a bluetooth-based wireless gestural controller integrated into a violin bow, has just started shipping so we thought it would be a good time to catch up with Keith and find out more about the project. I met Keith at his studio...

The Video Processing System, Part 2

In our last article, we began to create our processing system by putting the essential structure in place and adding our input handling stage. In this installment we are going to be adding a gaussian blur and color tweaking controls to our patch.

Max 5 Guitar Processor, Part 5

In this, the final episode of our guitar processing extravaganza, we are going to step away from making effects and focus on performance support. For a system as complicated as this, performance support means two things: patch storage and realtime control. Thus, we will learn to create a preset system and manipulate the various on-screen controls with an inexpensive MIDI footpedal system.

The 2009 NAMM Show

I recently attended Winter NAMM 2009 in Anaheim,CA, where Cycling '74 was sharing booth space with our friends at Ableton. I arrived on Friday afternoon, well after we had released our product announcement for Max for Live, and was impressed by the volume of booth traffic we were getting. Ableton had, of course, also announced their new Akai controller and Live 8 in addition to Max for Live, so there was a great deal of buzz surrounding our area of the show...

Tools for Creating Devices in Live

This article provides a brief tour of the features we’ve added to Max for creating Live devices. If you’re familiar with our old plug-in development objects, we hope you’ll notice the major improvements we’ve made. If you’re new to creating Max content for audio and MIDI processing, we hope this tour will give you a [...]

My Perspective on Integrating Max and Live

David Zicarelli gives some insight on the decision to integrate Max within Live...

Announcing Max for Live

Cycling '74 and Ableton today announced Max for Live, the integration of Cycling '74's Max/MSP environment into Ableton Live. Available as an add-on product to Ableton's newly announced Live 8, Max for Live permits users to create devices that extend and customize Live by creating instruments, controllers, audio effects, and MIDI processors.

An Interview with Mattijs Kneppers

These days it seems that everyone wants to be an artist so I found it refreshing to meet someone who see himself as an engineer that wanted to create tools for artists. Mattijs Kneppers spoke to me by phone from his home in Holland.

Anniversary at a West Coast Safari

Cycling '74 began developing and selling software officially in late 1997, and it was in 1998 that the company incorporated and hired its first few employees. To celebrate ten years of our continued existence, we decided to have an anniversary party. Here's how it went...

A Look Back at AES 2008 in San Francisco

We rolled out of bed and into our suits this weekend to attend the annual Audio Engineering Society (AES) conference at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, a mere 5 blocks from our SOMA office. We occupied a small piece of real estate in the shadow of the big Mackie booth, and directly across from a booth featuring big reels of magnetic tape.

Announcing Expo ’74

Cycling '74 today announced that its first user conference, Expo '74, will be held in San Francisco next April. The conference will include presentations, installations, workshops, and collaborative events covering the company's Max/MSP/Jitter software. Details will be outlined on the conference web site (expo74.net) in the coming months.

Announcing Expo ’74: Our First User Conference

I'm pleased to announce that Cycling '74 will be hosting its first user conference next year, Expo '74. The conference will run three days from April 22-24, 2009 and will be held at the new (and intensely colored) Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I'd like to tell you why we decided to put on this event and what you can expect to happen if you attend...

CNMAT Summer School 2008

Recently, CNMAT at UC Berkeley held their annual MaxMSP/Jitter summer school classes at their beautiful Arch St. facility just off the UC campus. This year, for the second year in a row, I had the pleasure of teaching the Jitter Night School - a 3-night intensive of focussed tutorials covering a variety of Jitter topics.

Email to Customers (April 24, 2008)

Hello from Cycling '74 headquarters. We have some big news. Max 5 is now available for download. We're very excited about this major upgrade and we hope you will be too. This upgrade represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. Finally, we are offering a new Max/MSP/Jitter Workshop for Beginners in London. For complete details, please visit our Workshop page...

Improving Your Patching Workflow

In addition to the smoother look and feel of Max 5, there have been a number of enhancements to the user interface that will help you to maximize your creative productivity and minimize the time spent performing repetitive and annoying tasks. In this article, I'll talk about a couple of the features that have really improved my patching workflow.

Cycling ’74 Releases Max/MSP Version 5

Cycling ’74 today released Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity...

A Video and Text Interview with Monome

Brian Crabtree (who performs under the name tehn) and his partner Kelli Cain are collectively known as monome. They design what they call adaptable, minimalist interfaces. The musical instrument industry calls them alternate controllers. There are currently three models that interface with a computer. There is no hard-wired functionality; interaction between the keys and lights is determined by the application (such as Max/MSP) running on the computer. Basically the monome units can do whatever ...