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‘video’

The Video Processing System, Part 1

Between the tutorials, Jitter Recipes, and all of the example content, there are many Jitter patches floating around that each do one thing pretty well, but very few of them give a sense of how to scale up into a more complex system. Inspired by a recent patching project and Darwin Grosse's guitar processing articles, this series of tutorials will present a Jitter-based live video processing system using simple reusable modules, a consistent control interface, and optimized GPU-based processes w...

An Interview with Dana Karwas

When you think of multimedia technology you think mostly about the technology. When you experience Dana Karwas' work you think of the rich organic layers of experience. Dana is working in the nebulous grey area between art and design. As a trained architect she is commissioned to do design works for giants such as Knoll, yet as an artist she creates amazingly tactile and organic performances like her work Party Dress and the installation Fursicle. Although based in architecture, Dana’s work us...

An Interview with Mattijs Kneppers

These days it seems that everyone wants to be an artist so I found it refreshing to meet someone who see himself as an engineer that wanted to create tools for artists. Mattijs Kneppers spoke to me by phone from his home in Holland.

A Look Back at AES 2008 in San Francisco

We rolled out of bed and into our suits this weekend to attend the annual Audio Engineering Society (AES) conference at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, a mere 5 blocks from our SOMA office. We occupied a small piece of real estate in the shadow of the big Mackie booth, and directly across from a booth featuring big reels of magnetic tape.

Announcing Expo ’74

Cycling '74 today announced that its first user conference, Expo '74, will be held in San Francisco next April. The conference will include presentations, installations, workshops, and collaborative events covering the company's Max/MSP/Jitter software. Details will be outlined on the conference web site (expo74.net) in the coming months.

Announcing Expo ’74: Our First User Conference

I'm pleased to announce that Cycling '74 will be hosting its first user conference next year, Expo '74. The conference will run three days from April 22-24, 2009 and will be held at the new (and intensely colored) Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I'd like to tell you why we decided to put on this event and what you can expect to happen if you attend...

Data Collection: Building Databases Using SQLite

Those of you who are paying close attention already know that Max 5 includes a database that manages all the files in the search path and makes handy things like the File Browser possible. To enable this functionality, we wrote an SQLite object to do all the important work under the hood. However, the SQLite object in Max isn't really something that you can type into an object box, and it doesn't come with any help files or documentation. In this article, we'll look at ways to interface with thi...

Siggraph 2008

Last week, Siggraph 2008 took over the Los Angeles Convention Center, and Cycling '74 was there to bravely represent Jitter to a huge crowd of CG enthusiasts, production professionals, and academics. For anyone who hasn't been to a Siggraph show, it is a huge, over-stimulating event for the computer graphics community, complete with academic talks, screenings, an exhibition hall, an art show, competitions, and a job fair.

Email to Customers (April 24, 2008)

Hello from Cycling '74 headquarters. We have some big news. Max 5 is now available for download. We're very excited about this major upgrade and we hope you will be too. This upgrade represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. Finally, we are offering a new Max/MSP/Jitter Workshop for Beginners in London. For complete details, please visit our Workshop page...

Improving Your Patching Workflow

In addition to the smoother look and feel of Max 5, there have been a number of enhancements to the user interface that will help you to maximize your creative productivity and minimize the time spent performing repetitive and annoying tasks. In this article, I'll talk about a couple of the features that have really improved my patching workflow.

Cycling ’74 Releases Max/MSP Version 5

Cycling ’74 today released Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity...

Announcing Max/MSP Version 5

Cycling '74 today announced Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.

A First Look at Max 5

A quick video-illustrated look at Max5.

Max 5: What It Is (and Isn’t)

Some of you may have heard that major changes are imminent in the Max world, and there is a lot of speculation about what those changes might be. On the eve of our first public exposition of the new version of Max at the AES convention in New York, I thought it would be appropriate to offer some details on the product.

Email to Customers (May 21, 2007)

Hello from Cycling '74 headquarters. We have three things to tell you about. Read more...

Your First Shader

Typically, when I talk to Jitter users about writing one's own shader programs for use with jit.gl.slab, I usually get glazed-over eyes and this sort of distant look of wonder. When I try to explain how easy it is, that look typically turns to one of annoyed disbelief. So, for a long time now I've been thinking about writing an article to de-mystify the process of writing your own GLSL shaders, and to help everyone avoid some common frustrations.

Making Connections: Connecting a Joystick to MaxMSP/Jitter

Max is all about making connections. The Making Connections series of tutorials will introduce you to new connections you can make between MaxMSP and the outside world. This tutorial, the first in the series, will discuss the use of HID devices such as USB game controllers as gestural interfaces for your Max patches.

An Interview With Tim Place

In this interview, Tim Place speaks about his work as a developer and artist, charting the numerous development projects which pooled together to create Hipno.

Networking: Max talking to Max

Networking is a sometimes confusing world. There are many networking options built into Max, and this article will endeavour to make clear which option is best for your application.

Cycling ’74 Updates Max/MSP/Jitter for Mac Intel

Cycling '74, a San Francisco-based music software company, today released Max/MSP v. 4.6 and Jitter v. 1.6 which add Universal Binary support for Intel-based Macs running OS 10.4 or later.

A Video Interview with Matthew Lewis, Graphics Research Specialist

Matthew Lewis: Education through synesthetic study and play.

A Noisy Matrix

Many people already know that Jitter can be a fantastic tool for video processing, but what about audio? Used with a bit of cleverness, a matrix can be just the thing for that patching impasse. Following is a set of simple examples to get you started thinking about a matrix when you've run thin on patching ideas or need a more elegant way to manage your numbers.

Stupid JS Trick #2: Dragging a Window Around

Welcome to the second installment of Stupid JS Tricks. If you missed the previous installment, you can take trip back in time to see us resize our patcher's interface. In this trick we will rise to a brave new challenge: to drag a window around on our screen without using the standard drag-able region provided on that window by the operating system.

Stupid JS Tricks

This hopefully periodic new column will attempt to get Max's JavaScript object, JS, to jump through a few hoops and garner our applause.