tutorials


  • Vizzie Visions: Episode 1, Presets

    In this first episode of the quarterly Vizzie Visions series, we explore the use of the PRESETTR module, and using it along with a few other modules to create complex and interesting Vizzie patches with stored presets and dynamic routing.


  • A Few Minutes with BEAP, Part 1

    Max 7 includes a new set of tools developed by Matthew Davidson for his work as a Berklee School of Music instructor.


  • Buffer Shuffler 2.0 Video Series

    Get to know the Max for Live Buffer Shuffler 2.0.


  • Programming in Max For Live Video Series

    Get an introduction to programming in the Max environment in this series of eight tutorial videos on the Max Wiki.


  • Working with Hardware: DMX, Part 1

    In this tutorial series, you can explore the world of programming DMX with Max.


  • gen~: The Garden of Earthly Delays

    Sequence of little patches for some audio fun.


  • Polyphonic Synthesizer Tutorial

    How poly~, adsr~, and thispoly~ work together.


  • Demystifying Expressions in Jitter

    One of the most feared and respected objects in the Jitter collection, jit.expr arrived on the scene as part of Jitter 1.5.


  • Making Connections: Camera Data

    Coming up with ways to get information about the physical world into Max is one of the most fun aspects of working with the software. Whether it is for video processing, sound creation, or any other type of output, physical interactions provide a space for much more interesting relationships to develop. Unfortunately, many ways to get this information into Max require the user to get comfortable with connecting wires to circuit boards and understanding basic (and sometimes not-so-basic) electronics. For this reason, camera-based interactivity can be pretty enticing. There is also a reasonably low startup cost and plugging a camera in is usually a pretty user-friendly process. In this article, I will share a couple of basic techniques for using affordable webcams to gather data in MaxMSP/Jitter.


  • The Video Processing System, Part 1

    Between the tutorials, Jitter Recipes, and all of the example content, there are many Jitter patches floating around that each do one thing pretty well, but very few of them give a sense of how to scale up into a more complex system. Inspired by a recent patching project and Darwin Grosse's guitar processing articles, this series of tutorials will present a Jitter-based live video processing system using simple reusable modules, a consistent control interface, and optimized GPU-based processes wherever possible. The purpose of these articles is to provide an over-the-shoulder view of my creative process in building more complex Jitter patches for video processing.


  • Max 5 Guitar Processor, Part 1

    In an earlier article, Andrew Benson and Ben Bracken went through the process of connecting a guitar to a Max-based processing system, and creating a few guitar-oriented effects patches. In this series of articles, I will be building a Max-based guitar processing "rig", and will give you the opportunity to look over my shoulder as I design and implement this system.


  • LFO Tutorial 1: The Zen of the Silent Patch

    I'm personally a lot more interested in the ability to synchronize processes in Max using time values that resemble musical note values to create control structures that can be easily time synced. This tutorial is about making one of those kinds of modules - a quartet of synchronized LFOs whose outputs I can sample individually for several kinds of data (triggers for waveform start, LFO outputs that I can sample at variably synchronized rates, and a nifty summed waveform I can use for more exotic kinds of control).


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