About Teleo


    Jan 25 2006 | 3:52 pm
    Dear all, I'm really interested to buy Teleo ( http://www.makingthings.com/products/documentation/teleo_int ro_user_guide/index.html ) , "a line of hardware tools that provide an easy way to create unique interactive devices, machines, and environments by controlling a wide range of sensors and actuators".
    Some doubt (sorry for my englsh!!!):
    1 - Teleo Starter Kit (the 189$ one :-) should consist in a "Teleo Introductory Module", that is an hardware interface where it's possible to link analog and digital sensors from 0 to 5 V. It also linkable to pc via USB.
    This Starter kit includes also three sensors.
    Should this inizial packet be enought to begin?
    I mean, if I link sensors to Teleo and Teleo to pc, will MaxMSP be able to recognize it?
    2 - If I will build my own sensors (that receive or send an electric voltage between 0 and 5V), is it possible to link them to Teleo?
    3 - I'm not able to understand the exactly function of these three sensors included in the Teleo Starter Kit: a push button assembly, a photocell sensor assembly and a lamp assembly.
    Are they analog or digital?
    What the difference between "photocell" and "lamp"? (My english is not good enought :-)
    4 - Does exist others solutions (under 400$ ) near to this one?
    5 - Should I buy it? :-)
    I'm a C programmer, so I would like to use it for my projects... and with Max of course!

    • Jan 25 2006 | 5:24 pm
      > 1 - Teleo Starter Kit (the 189$ one :-) should consist in a "Teleo
      > Introductory Module", that is an hardware interface where it's possible to
      > link analog and digital sensors from 0 to 5 V. It also linkable to pc via USB.
      > This Starter kit includes also three sensors.
      > Should this inizial packet be enought to begin?
      > I mean, if I link sensors to Teleo and Teleo to pc, will MaxMSP be able to
      > recognize it?
      This should work fine. Making Things integrates very well via the Max
      objects they supply on their site. The Starter Kit is a great place to get
      going.
      > 2 - If I will build my own sensors (that receive or send an electric voltage
      > between 0 and 5V), is it possible to link them to Teleo?
      Sure. They have screw-in connectors that you would connect to (for the
      analog input).
      > 3 - I'm not able to understand the exactly function of these three sensors
      > included in the Teleo Starter Kit: a push button assembly, a photocell sensor
      > assembly and a lamp assembly.
      > Are they analog or digital?
      > What the difference between "photocell" and "lamp"? (My english is not good
      > enought :-)
      I believe they are all analog (I'd have to look, but I'm pretty sure). The
      lamp is a light that you can turn on with your program, the photocell looks
      for light and generates a control signal.
      > 4 - Does exist others solutions (under 400$ ) near to this one?
      I don't have a good answer to this...
      > 5 - Should I buy it? :-)
      I think so. I'm a big fan.
      [ddg]
      Darwin Grosse
    • Jan 25 2006 | 5:50 pm
      > 4 - Does exist others solutions (under 400$ ) near to this one?
      I am very happy with the Phidgets interfaces and sensors:
      ARJ'
    • Jan 25 2006 | 6:11 pm
      Hi,
      try these links:
      http://wiring.org.co/ioboard/index.html
      http://arduino.berlios.de/
      http://www.create.ucsb.edu/~dano/CUI/
      http://www.tigoe.net/pcomp/stamp/index.shtml
      http://wiring.org.co/learning/index.html
      Nillow
      nillow@surfemail.com.br
      --
      _____________Nillow_MaTeMa........................:
      baixem o album do matema 17mp3 num pacote-->
    • Jan 25 2006 | 10:14 pm
      Thank you very much!
      So, Teleo is really interesting...
      I'm reading also about Phidgets sensors... but they doesn't speak about MaxMsp. That's not good :-)
      Here for example: http://www.phidgets.com/index.php?module=pncommerce&func =itemview&KID=113823005282.50.116.223&IID=63
      I can't find a MaxMSP software support (I will have to build in java or C my own max object, that's not the ideal solution).
    • Jan 26 2006 | 3:20 am
      > I'm reading also about Phidgets sensors... but they doesn't speak about MaxMsp. That's not good :-)
      You missed this page, which has Windows and Mac maxmsp support:
      I too have had good experiences with the Phidgets!
      Ben
    • Jan 26 2006 | 5:40 am
      Yes, I am still thinking which of the two I should choice, I only
      think that the Teleo Starter Kit is expensive. Especially if you add
      the 70$ shipping costs, that like more then 50% of the total sum.
      Crazy stuff.
    • Jan 26 2006 | 9:30 am
      Quote: Ben Nevile wrote on Wed, 25 January 2006 20:20
      > You missed this page, which has Windows and Mac maxmsp support
      Good!
      I'm reading about Phidgets InterfaceKit 8/8/8, that have
      8 Analog Inputs
      8 Digital Inputs
      8 Digital Outputs
      and a 2 Port USB Hub
      They sell it at 85$, it's pretty cheap. But without any sensors included...So, if I buy three sensors (like Teleo Starter Kit) the price is not so different.
      Weyert let me know your choise! :)
    • Jan 26 2006 | 12:02 pm
      Hi
      > Good!
      > I'm reading about Phidgets InterfaceKit 8/8/8, that have
      > 8 Analog Inputs
      > 8 Digital Inputs
      > 8 Digital Outputs
      > and a 2 Port USB Hub
      >
      Yes, it looks nice! It's also cheaper in shipping costs, only the
      support for ActionScript/Flash is not as good as of Teleo. One of the
      issues I am planning to e-mail the UK reseller anyday now. To obtain
      some more information.
      > They sell it at 85$, it's pretty cheap. But without any sensors included...So, if I buy three sensors (like Teleo Starter Kit) the price is not so different.
      >
      > Weyert let me know your choise! :)
      >
      >
      >
    • Jan 26 2006 | 2:03 pm
      If you are researching various sensor devices that can talk to Max, then you might consider a few different options:
      * Teleo (you already know about this)
      * Eobody (Cycling '74)
      * Icube (Infusion Systems)
      * Kroonde (Cycling '74)
      * Toaster (La Kitchen)
      * Teabox (Electrotap)
      * Miditron (Cycling '74)
      So there are lots of options. The Teabox is something that I co-developed for several reasons, including a giant distrust of Apple's USB implementation after getting burned a few times with some of my installations.
      best,
      Tim
    • Jan 26 2006 | 5:17 pm
      I'm visiting the links you've posted.
      I see that:
      - Infusion Systems Icube costs 299$ and sends just midi signal (that is 128 values, when Teleo captures 1024 values.Is it right?)
      - Cycling74 Kroonde, that is wireless (amazing!) costs 1200$ ,like Kitchen Toaster :( Maybe tomorrow...
      -MidiTron it's just a MIDI Analog/Digital I/O Interface, not so different from my Roland PM-16 :-)
      -Electrotap Teabox is really interesting. It costs just $395 (plus 100$ for the starter kit) and it has a really low latency.
      I'm thinking about how it communicates with the PC: I'm reading that it sends audio throught an S/PDIF cable, so I need an audio card with a S/PDIF input, is it right?
      I have an M-Audio Audiophile Firewire so I would have no problem.
      It's not cheaper as Teleo, but it's really really nice.
      And it has 4095 different values for every signal!
      But I can't understand the meant of the four jack/XLR connections... I mean, the input (4 digital and 2 analog) are on the rear pannel... Maybe the four XLR/Jack connections are for send signal to sensors?
    • Jan 26 2006 | 7:32 pm
    • Jan 26 2006 | 7:37 pm
      Hi again... Yes you need a S/PDIF cable, but one comes with the box (optical by default, but you can request a coaxial cable instead).
      There are 8 continuous analog inputs. All 8 are available via I-Cube-style connectors, while 4 of them are available via 1/4" or XLR. The back panel has RJ11 (telephone) jacks which bundle 4 sensors onto a single cable. The analog inputs can be accessed there too, as well as 16 additional digital inputs.
      Hope that makes sense!
      -Tim
    • Jan 26 2006 | 7:50 pm
      Hi Bruno,
      On Jan 26, 2006, at 12:17 PM, Bruno Zamborlin wrote:
      >
      > I'm visiting the links you've posted.
      > I see that:
      > - Infusion Systems Icube costs 299$ and sends just midi signal
      > (that is 128 values, when Teleo captures 1024 values.Is it right?)
      I believe they also have a wireless version that sends midi data.
      With some of the Midi transport sensor systems you can bump up the
      resolution to 14bit (pitch bend) data although you'll add some
      latency to the system. (be aware that it is difficult to find
      sensors that can give 14 bit resolution.) I don't know if the iCube
      can do this but you could look into it. (I believe the MidiTron works
      this way.)
      > - Cycling74 Kroonde, that is wireless (amazing!) costs 1200$ ,like
      > Kitchen Toaster :( Maybe tomorrow...
      >
      > -MidiTron it's just a MIDI Analog/Digital I/O Interface, not so
      > different from my Roland PM-16 :-)
      It's similar to Teleo in that you can send the data in and out, but
      the Teleo has modules already built for controlling servos, etc,
      whereas you may need to do a little more work to get the MidiTron
      doing everything you want - of course it may cost less that way.
      > -Electrotap Teabox is really interesting. It costs just $395 (plus
      > 100$ for the starter kit) and it has a really low latency.
      > I'm thinking about how it communicates with the PC: I'm reading
      > that it sends audio throught an S/PDIF cable, so I need an audio
      > card with a S/PDIF input, is it right?
      > I have an M-Audio Audiophile Firewire so I would have no problem.
      Yes to the above. Or a computer with a s/pdif input (G5, intelMac, etc)
      > It's not cheaper as Teleo, but it's really really nice.
      > And it has 4095 different values for every signal!
      > But I can't understand the meant of the four jack/XLR
      > connections... I mean, the input (4 digital and 2 analog) are on
      > the rear pannel... Maybe the four XLR/Jack connections are for send
      > signal to sensors?
      The Teabox cannot send any data out. (Some day we'll get to that, but
      not yet.) So, if you need to send data out, this may not work for
      you, or you'll have to find another way.
      Basically there are 24 total inputs 8 are 12 bit, the other 16 are
      toggles (e.g. 1 bit) All are sampled around 4kHz. You can access
      the 8 -12bit sensors 3 or 4 ways (3 pin header, 2 banks of 4 RJ-11
      telephone jacks, and the first four can be connected via the front
      XLR-1/4" combo jacks.) The other 16 toggles are connected to via 4
      RJ-11 telephone jacks in the back.
      A quick note - if you need another continuous input, you can send a
      variable frequency oscillating signal into the digital inputs in the
      back and count the number of times it switches. This gives a low res
      sensor for each of the 16 inputs on the back. We've built a
      "digitizer" that is essentially a 555 timer to do the task.
    • Jan 26 2006 | 8:58 pm
      There is also the muio system, available in the UK for
    • Jan 27 2006 | 9:11 am
      Hi
      >> I'm visiting the links you've posted.
      >> I see that:
      >> - Infusion Systems Icube costs 299$ and sends just midi signal
      >> (that is 128 values, when Teleo captures 1024 values.Is it right?)
      >
      > I believe they also have a wireless version that sends midi data.
      Yes, the WiMinidig is wireless, really small and now even at half the
      price:
      http://infusionsystems.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/21 /
      products_id/98
      >> - Cycling74 Kroonde, that is wireless (amazing!) costs 1200
      >> $ ,like Kitchen Toaster :( Maybe tomorrow...
      We have a Kroonde which works nicely, but today I think IRCAM's
      WiseBox is a better buy (using standard wifi):
      >> -Electrotap Teabox is really interesting. It costs just $395 (plus
      >> 100$ for the starter kit) and it has a really low latency.
      >> I'm thinking about how it communicates with the PC: I'm reading
      >> that it sends audio throught an S/PDIF cable, so I need an audio
      >> card with a S/PDIF input, is it right?
      If you need speed, Teabox is definitely the best buy! But if you are
      more into building several smaller devices, it is too big and
      expensive, and then you could go with any of the cheaper/smaller
      solutions. I use the Teabox in our motion lab, and then I use
      Phidgets when I build smaller devices.
      Or if you want it really cheap, and like to solder, you can hack a
      gamepad and make some sensors yourself. Here's the story about how we
      build a "10 dollar" instrument last year:
      http://www.hf.uio.no/imv/forskning/forskningsprosjekter/
      musicalgestures/publications/pdf/jensenius-cmmr2005.pdf
      Cheers,
      Alexander
    • Jan 27 2006 | 10:23 am
      Got a couple of 404's here; first from this link, and
      also for arj.tools, (which are also notable by their
      omission from the Max Objects database),
      cheers
      Roger
      > you can hack a
      > gamepad and make some sensors yourself. Here's the
      > story about how we
      > build a "10 dollar" instrument last year:
      >
      http://www.hf.uio.no/imv/forskning/forskningsprosjekter/
      >
      >
      musicalgestures/publications/pdf/jensenius-cmmr2005.pdf
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Alexander
      >
    • Jan 27 2006 | 10:46 am
      The link gets messup up because it is on seperate lines... remove the '%20' section when you cut-and-paste it into your browser.
      The download section for the gamepad to OSC/MIDI (which is great - thanks Alexander!) is http://www.hf.uio.no/imv/forskning/forskningsprosjekter/musi calgestures/resources/multicontrol/index.html
    • Jan 27 2006 | 11:35 am
      Many thanks.
      Love the 'CheapStick' ; at last a use for all that
      conductive plastic I've been hoarding ;-)
      cheers
      Roger
    • Jan 28 2006 | 9:19 pm
      You might also want to take a look at my solution, the MidiTron. See
      Eric
      --
      ********************************************
      * MidiTron MIDI to Real World Interface *
      * Now available from http://eroktronix.com *
      * Only $149 *
      ********************************************
    • Jan 29 2006 | 11:58 am
      ...not to forget
      www.interface-z.com
      small, paris-based company with reliable and cheap solutions. french-
      only-website w schematics and pd-patches
      (disclaimer: the owners are close friends of mine - regardless/
      despite/because of their products)
      best
      h
      hans w. koch
      im krahnenhof 11
      d-50668 koeln
      +49-221-554902
      www.hans-w-koch.net
    • Jan 29 2006 | 12:41 pm
      ... and last but not least, they are absolutely kind and reliable. And
      really cheap. One of my favorite choice for any kind of custom hardware.
      f.e
    • Jan 29 2006 | 11:20 pm
      I'm getting very interested in the Ardinuo boards - is anybody using them?
      I would value hearing feedback on any of the other boards. I've been using the Teleo system, and I can only recommend it - the guys at makingthings run a great list. The only problem is expense, as shipping things to the EU/UK is a costly business.
    • Jan 29 2006 | 11:30 pm
      I am actually going to be buckling down with an arduino board over the
      next week.
      It's a solid enough platform that we are seriously considering using
      these instead of Microchip's PICs next year at NYU.
    • Jan 30 2006 | 9:12 pm
      Thank you all.That's my conclusion:
      Teabox, Eobody and Interface-Z can't send data to sensors, they just receive. So I discarded them.
      Kroonde, Icube and Toaster and too expensive.
      In my budget range (approximately not more than 600$) I am uncertain between Miditron (149$, it has 20 sockets at all, that you can decide to use ad inputs or outputs, analogs or digitals, but however it works just with MIDI) and Teleo, that has "just" 10 sockets but it works faster that MIDI and is pretty cheap (189$ + shipping cost).
      Has been invented some other sensor during these days? :-)
    • Jan 30 2006 | 9:51 pm
      Hey Bruno,
      I may have misunderstood you here, but NONE of the sensors so far
      mentioned respond to the computer, whatever interface, they only input
      from the user to the system.
      You can of course change how the computer interprets data from the
      sensor.
      >Kroonde, Icube and Toaster and too expensive.
      yeah, & as previously mentioned by someone else about the I-Cube
      - those connectors...ouch!
      regards
      Simon
    • Jan 30 2006 | 9:55 pm
      I'm not so sure about the Teleo's speed advantage, although my
      information is second-hand. I had a customer who decided to switch to
      my gluion interface because the Teleo wasn't responsive enough for his
      project where he needed to control a lot of outputs. I think the reason
      was that while the Teleo has a fast USB link, it's "network" connection
      (I2C ?) towards additional modules is a bit slow. Might not apply to
      your project if you just stick with the starter kit...
      But if you only have a few sensors/actuators anyway, MIDI should be
      fine.
      I haven't mentioned the gluion yet as it's sorta outside the price
      range you specified (starting at 455 Euro), but if you wanna have a
      look anyway: glui.de/prod/gluion.html
      in short: 16 analog + 68 digital, OSC-based, bi-directional, digital
      sensors
    • Jan 31 2006 | 8:29 am
      Did u check out the Labjack products?
      http://www.labjack.com/index.html
      These days I'm looking into more or less the same needs as you have in your
      project and I thought about the U-series they have... they also have some
      nice sensors/adds-on/ect you can buy and the prices are realy friendly. They
      have a cool and nice support as well.... it sounds like i'm working there
      but realy not :)
      ido
    • Feb 01 2006 | 7:02 pm
      Two questions:
      1 - Is Miditron too slow for real time application? I mean, in Teabox website ( http://www.electrotap.com/teabox/ ) they talk about 23ms latency in any MIDI interface... that is absolutely too much. Is it true for you?
      What are the problems in workin with MIDI data?
      I sent an email to Eroktronix and they talk about just 1 ms of latency for any MIDI message (so, if I have 10 sensors connected and only one changes, it will take 1 ms, but if they all change, it will take 10 ms (the time to send data for 10 sensors via MIDI).
      I'm thinking that, to work in real time, I will need that sensors interface latency + sound card latency < 10-15ms.
      My sound card have about 7 ms of latency... so I'm not sure if it's possible to work with midi...
      2 - In Teleo website they don't talk about latency.
      Does anybody know how many milliseconds it is?
    • Feb 01 2006 | 9:18 pm
      Quote: Ido G. wrote on Tue, 31 January 2006 01:29
      ----------------------------------------------------
      > Did u check out the Labjack products?
      Thank you very much, that's almost perfect! But I can't find anything about MaxMSP...
      Can LabJack U12 communicate with Max?
    • Feb 01 2006 | 11:15 pm
      > I sent an email to Eroktronix and they talk about just 1 ms of latency
      > for any MIDI message (so, if I have 10 sensors connected and only one
      > changes, it will take 1 ms, but if they all change, it will take 10 ms
      > (the time to send data for 10 sensors via MIDI).
      My experience is that you should usually take the worst case scenario.
      Especially because sensors are rarely completely stable, e.g. on a data
      glove with bend sensors the values will always fluctuate a bit even if
      you're not performing a meaningful gesture. Exception might be
      fader-box type of controllers.
      Your question also raises another issue, that of latency jitter.
      There's studies that say it can be more irritating than a high, but
      constant latency.
      > I'm thinking that, to work in real time, I will need that sensors
      > interface latency + sound card latency < 10-15ms.
      > My sound card have about 7 ms of latency... so I'm not sure if it's
      > possible to work with midi...
      sorry for the cliche answer but it really depends on your controller
      design, i.e. how many sensors and what type.
      > 2 - In Teleo website they don't talk about latency.
      > Does anybody know how many milliseconds it is?
      >
    • Feb 02 2006 | 12:49 am
      The numbers for calculating latency on the Teabox page make a few assumptions.
      First, with MIDI you usually will be sending 3-byte MIDI Messages (for noteon, cc, etc) for each sensor. Remember that bytes for MIDI are 10 bits in length. So if you have 24 sensors * 3 bytes each it is a total of 72 bytes or 720 bits of data through which you must cycle to get all of the values.
      MIDI uses a transmission rate of 31250 bits per second, thus 720/31250 = 23.04ms. However, this is a best case theoretical scenario - I've never seen MIDI perform nearly this well.
      As was mentioned, a variation (jitter) in latency makes things far worse. If there is one sensor and it works smoothly but starts getting funky when 9 other sensors are sending and then works smoothly again, it generally will not be happy times.
      Looks like you've sparked a lot of good conversation - hopefully you are making some good progress!
      -Tim
    • Feb 02 2006 | 8:06 am
      as already posted here right after your q... u have this -
      http://ljcontroller.bzhtec.com/?ljp=main
      only "problem" it doesn't support us pc users.... and no porting in the near
      future, too bad.
      ido
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Bruno Zamborlin"
      To:
      Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 9:18 PM
      Subject: [maxmsp] Re: Re: About Teleo
      >
      > Quote: Ido G. wrote on Tue, 31 January 2006 01:29
      > ----------------------------------------------------
      > > Did u check out the Labjack products?
      > > http://www.labjack.com/index.html
      >
      > Thank you very much, that's almost perfect! But I can't find anything
      about MaxMSP...
      > Can LabJack U12 communicate with Max?
      >
      >
    • Feb 02 2006 | 8:43 am
      I am really happy that there are solutions like Teabox and Gluion
      that provide fast and relatively inexpensive analog input (and
      output) to the computer.
      I just thought that it is worth mentioning that many people
      (including myself) succesfuly performed in real time with MIDI based
      sensor solutions, like the old I-cube ot the new MIDITron.
      I used Icube, made stuff from Ucapps.de, and used some analog to
      serial converters, like EZIO. While latency is there, I never saw it
      as a problem that would stop me from playing music with it. Many
      acoustic instruments have slow attack and musicians have to play
      "before" the sound actually occurs. It takes some time to learn to
      play with it, and you certainly can't use it to play drums in a band,
      but for many many things it works really good.
      So, while new fast solutions are great, MIDI interfaces like Eric's
      MIDITron are really cheap, work great, and in many cases provide an
      excellent solution for interactive works.
      just my 2c :)
      klif
      P.S. While I'm quite happy with mine (next year it will be 10 years
      since i bought it) i wouldn't recommend anyone to buy I-Cube these
      days. It is just too expensive.
    • Feb 02 2006 | 11:00 am
      Quote: Ido G. wrote on Thu, 02 February 2006 01:06
      ----------------------------------------------------
      > as already posted here right after your q... u have this -
      > http://ljcontroller.bzhtec.com/?ljp=main
      > only "problem" it doesn't support us pc users.... and no porting in the near
      > future, too bad.
      > ido
      I see. And at the moment I am a PC user.
      By the way, is it possible to communicate with UE9 or U12 using some TCP objects of Max?
      Netsend and netreceive for example...I guess.
      I sent an email to Labjack and they told me they are not familiar with Max, but "Any program/language capable of sending/receiving TCP data, can talk to the UE9 by sending low-level commands over the Ethernet interface.".
    • Feb 02 2006 | 4:30 pm
      > Did u check out the Labjack products?
      I thought the Labjack looked really nice from the pictures on the web
      site, but was surprised by how big it is (at least compared to other
      solutions). I also found the max externals to be rather difficult to
      work with. I much prefer the Phidgets.
      Cheers,
      Alexander
    • Feb 02 2006 | 7:56 pm
      ok.... so they gave u an answer...
      also, some idea about teleo vs U12 - the U12 has more inputs and outputs,
      and the analog inputs are better on the U12. The Teleo appears to be
      targeted towards motor control and robotics, as it has 2 high power PWM
      outputs that the U12 does not have.
      so u might try to investigate deeper according to ur needs.
      ido
    • May 27 2006 | 11:17 pm
      Hi,
      So it seems there are quite a lot of interfaces you can choose! To make things even more 'difficult' please have a look at our kit called BlueSense. As a plus BlueSense supports wireless modules which can be helpfull on mobile robots.
      I 'upgraded' a record player with some servo motor via BlueSense which you can examine at:
      www.planetbosman.com
      regards,
      Dinne Bosman
    • May 28 2006 | 7:08 pm
      Nobody will see this after all of those answers, but here's a bit of information:
      The cheapest, most flexible interface I have found is the CRUMB board, which comes in a wireless version. I think the price for the basic board is around 30 EUR. You can connect anything to it, and get anything out of it, and there are USB as well as serial connections.
      At the weekly electronic-music performance workshops I've been hosting at our theater for the past three years, we've tried as many approaches as we could get our hands on, with an emphasis on quick, inexpensive solutions. Sure, the cheapest sensor-interface is a joystick with potentiometers soldered onto it. The most interesting sensors, however, are digital, and everyone wants to be wireless. For this reason, CRUMB is the way to go. It's use requires some knowledge and work, it is not a plug-and-play device. Because of this, though, it can allow you to do things you cannot do because some engineer thinks you shouldn't want to.
      I should reall write an article about what we tried and what happened...
    • May 28 2006 | 7:33 pm
    • May 28 2006 | 9:45 pm
      I think he might have been referring to these:
    • May 28 2006 | 9:58 pm
      It is worth looking at the Arduino project as well. No wireless
      solution yet AFAIK, but cheap, USB/serial and works great (at least
      for what I needed).
      Here :
      hth,
      Julien.
    • May 28 2006 | 10:01 pm
      also...
      Link to hardware manual:
      http://www.robotica.eng.br/Documentos/Crumb128.pdf
      AVR Freaks page:
      http://www.avrfreaks.net/index.php?module=FreaksTools&fu nc=viewItem&item_type=tool&item_id=517
    • May 29 2006 | 3:03 am
      A while back I put up a table with info about a number of different
      sensor interface solutions at the SensorWiki:
      Feel free to add information about devices that are not included.
      Thanks,
      Alexander
    • May 29 2006 | 9:58 am
      >It is worth looking at the Arduino project as
      >well. No wireless solution yet AFAIK, but cheap,
      >USB/serial and works great (at least for what I
      >needed).
      so mutch possibility...
      there also? but not plug and play
      Arduino is more plug and play,with proce66ing, pd?
      very mutch doc on line and it is getting the
      comon choise from computer art skool/univ., now
      in France, so, developing aroud will grow very
      mutch?
      miditron also is "plug and play" with max, and have good tutorial , need midi,
      more professional choise from theater ligthing,
      commom is DMX protocol interface type...more
      expensive, hardware type "theater black metal
      design" not for amateur (for security, and stong
      ampere / watt burning.?)
      I wonder Wath is a good choise for drive several
      big stepper motor (1Amper eatch) like 4 or 5 or
      6 nema for motion control...like robot in the
      factory, or 16mm/35mm camera head?
      bilt microship is long way, professional solution
      is expensive, amateur solution is not inof strong
      and secure... and so mutch card for stepper
      motor, so much info on astronomic photo-club, or
      robotic drill-sculpture...I lost way.
      it must exist ready-made (usb) camera-head with
      hpan, vpan, tilt can drive from max, and can
      carry until 1kg stuff(camera, laser, ligth,
      miror...)
      RCX lego was fun in 1999 on window 98...
    • May 29 2006 | 12:09 pm
      I' ve made this sensor interface
      (under "sensor interface")
      that is plug and play.
      It receives for analog and 4 switch and transmits 150 meters along.
      It will be cheap less than 150 euros
      and the only cable u'll have will be sensors cables.
      Im building now a new one
      that is a lot more little than this one
      and i'll finishing maybe on end of july.
      cheers