importing 3d objects with joints


    May 31 2007 | 9:59 pm
    Hi all,
    Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if so, is it
    possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate physics?
    Many thanks!
    Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
    Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
    Virginia Tech
    Dept. of Music - 0240
    Blacksburg, VA 24061
    (540) 231-1137
    (540) 231-5034 (fax)
    ico@vt.edu
    http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/

    • May 31 2007 | 10:22 pm
      What format is the joint data in?
      wes
      On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > Hi all,
      >
      > Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if so, is it
      > possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate physics?
      >
      > Many thanks!
      >
      > Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      > Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      > Virginia Tech
      > Dept. of Music - 0240
      > Blacksburg, VA 24061
      > (540) 231-1137
      > (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      > ico@vt.edu
      > http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      > http://ico.bukvic.net
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Jun 01 2007 | 12:35 am
      None specific. I am wondering whether this can be used at all in Jitter in
      the first place. If this was possible, then my second questions was your
      first one ;-).
      Ico
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-bounces@cycling74.com]
      > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 6:23 PM
      > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >
      > What format is the joint data in?
      >
      > wes
      >
      > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > > Hi all,
      > >
      > > Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if so,
      > is it
      > > possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate physics?
      > >
      > > Many thanks!
      > >
      > > Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      > > Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      > > Virginia Tech
      > > Dept. of Music - 0240
      > > Blacksburg, VA 24061
      > > (540) 231-1137
      > > (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      > > ico@vt.edu
      > > http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      > > http://ico.bukvic.net
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
    • Jun 01 2007 | 1:32 am
      Here is how you could do it, but it is not trivial. That said it is
      also not incredibly difficult. It will just take some time. What you
      want to do is export your model and for each vertex export a list of
      bones they are attached to along with a corresponding weighting
      factor. Usually vertices will have 3 or 4 bones with the total weight
      adding to 1. Once you have this, you will export your bone
      orientations and positions which can be in a number of formats but
      will eventually need to be converted to a 3x4 matrix (modelview matrix
      without the last row). This data, sent to a skinning shader will
      animate your mesh according to the underlying bone structure and it
      will look good.
      As far as joints are concerned, you could model them in jit.gl.lua
      with the ODE module. Just figure out who to setup the different joint
      types in ODE and position them correctly, and the simulation should
      take care of the rest.
      best,
      wes
      On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > None specific. I am wondering whether this can be used at all in Jitter in
      > the first place. If this was possible, then my second questions was your
      > first one ;-).
      >
      > Ico
      >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-bounces@cycling74.com]
      > > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 6:23 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      > >
      > > What format is the joint data in?
      > >
      > > wes
      > >
      > > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > > > Hi all,
      > > >
      > > > Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if so,
      > > is it
      > > > possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate physics?
      > > >
      > > > Many thanks!
      > > >
      > > > Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      > > > Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      > > > Virginia Tech
      > > > Dept. of Music - 0240
      > > > Blacksburg, VA 24061
      > > > (540) 231-1137
      > > > (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      > > > ico@vt.edu
      > > > http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      > > > http://ico.bukvic.net
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      >
      >
    • Jun 01 2007 | 2:34 am
      Many thanks for the explanation. All this being said, is there a particular
      3d modeler software that makes this transition less cumbersome than others?
      Also, I am just curious if anyone has already had a chance to actually
      implement some of this?
      Best wishes,
      Ico
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-bounces@cycling74.com]
      > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 9:32 PM
      > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >
      > Here is how you could do it, but it is not trivial. That said it is
      > also not incredibly difficult. It will just take some time. What you
      > want to do is export your model and for each vertex export a list of
      > bones they are attached to along with a corresponding weighting
      > factor. Usually vertices will have 3 or 4 bones with the total weight
      > adding to 1. Once you have this, you will export your bone
      > orientations and positions which can be in a number of formats but
      > will eventually need to be converted to a 3x4 matrix (modelview matrix
      > without the last row). This data, sent to a skinning shader will
      > animate your mesh according to the underlying bone structure and it
      > will look good.
      >
      > As far as joints are concerned, you could model them in jit.gl.lua
      > with the ODE module. Just figure out who to setup the different joint
      > types in ODE and position them correctly, and the simulation should
      > take care of the rest.
      >
      > best,
      > wes
      >
      > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > > None specific. I am wondering whether this can be used at all in Jitter
      > in
      > > the first place. If this was possible, then my second questions was your
      > > first one ;-).
      > >
      > > Ico
      > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-
      > bounces@cycling74.com]
      > > > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > > > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 6:23 PM
      > > > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      > > >
      > > > What format is the joint data in?
      > > >
      > > > wes
      > > >
      > > > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > > > > Hi all,
      > > > >
      > > > > Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if
      > so,
      > > > is it
      > > > > possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate
      > physics?
      > > > >
      > > > > Many thanks!
      > > > >
      > > > > Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      > > > > Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      > > > > Virginia Tech
      > > > > Dept. of Music - 0240
      > > > > Blacksburg, VA 24061
      > > > > (540) 231-1137
      > > > > (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      > > > > ico@vt.edu
      > > > > http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      > > > > http://ico.bukvic.net
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > >
      > >
    • Jun 01 2007 | 2:45 am
      The closest ive come to any of this is object morphing with same
      vertex count objects, and ones that are fairly simple too.
      I would love to see this work, as a current project could really come
      to life with anything learned from this. I also remember seeing
      someone's webpage who frequents the list who did a human model in 3D
      that looked like it was animated, but names escape me.
      On May 31, 2007, at 10:34 PM, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > Many thanks for the explanation. All this being said, is there a
      > particular
      > 3d modeler software that makes this transition less cumbersome than
      > others?
      >
      > Also, I am just curious if anyone has already had a chance to actually
      > implement some of this?
      >
      > Best wishes,
      >
      > Ico
      >
      >> -----Original Message-----
      >> From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-
      >> bounces@cycling74.com]
      >> On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      >> Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 9:32 PM
      >> Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >>
      >> Here is how you could do it, but it is not trivial. That said it is
      >> also not incredibly difficult. It will just take some time. What
      >> you
      >> want to do is export your model and for each vertex export a list of
      >> bones they are attached to along with a corresponding weighting
      >> factor. Usually vertices will have 3 or 4 bones with the total
      >> weight
      >> adding to 1. Once you have this, you will export your bone
      >> orientations and positions which can be in a number of formats but
      >> will eventually need to be converted to a 3x4 matrix (modelview
      >> matrix
      >> without the last row). This data, sent to a skinning shader will
      >> animate your mesh according to the underlying bone structure and it
      >> will look good.
      >>
      >> As far as joints are concerned, you could model them in jit.gl.lua
      >> with the ODE module. Just figure out who to setup the different
      >> joint
      >> types in ODE and position them correctly, and the simulation should
      >> take care of the rest.
      >>
      >> best,
      >> wes
      >>
      >> On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      >>> None specific. I am wondering whether this can be used at all in
      >>> Jitter
      >> in
      >>> the first place. If this was possible, then my second questions
      >>> was your
      >>> first one ;-).
      >>>
      >>> Ico
      >>>
      >>>> -----Original Message-----
      >>>> From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-
      >> bounces@cycling74.com]
      >>>> On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      >>>> Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 6:23 PM
      >>>> Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >>>>
      >>>> What format is the joint data in?
      >>>>
      >>>> wes
      >>>>
      >>>> On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      >>>>> Hi all,
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if
      >> so,
      >>>> is it
      >>>>> possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate
      >> physics?
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Many thanks!
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      >>>>> Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      >>>>> Virginia Tech
      >>>>> Dept. of Music - 0240
      >>>>> Blacksburg, VA 24061
      >>>>> (540) 231-1137
      >>>>> (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      >>>>> ico@vt.edu
      >>>>> http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      >>>>> http://ico.bukvic.net
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >
      v a d e //
      www.vade.info
      abstrakt.vade.info
    • Jun 01 2007 | 2:58 am
      I think they used OSC to send to a 3d modelling program. That is
      certainly the easiest way to go. For getting the data in Jitter, your
      guess is as good as mine. I don't really use 3d modelling programs.
      The one time I tried to get the bone and weight data from Maya, I was
      confronted with having to write a C++ plugin. I wasn't about to go
      there because the Maya docs are pretty crap when it comes to their
      plugin API. I would love for this to be possible though as Maya has a
      fantastic interface for creating skinning weights and joints.
      wes
      On 5/31/07, vade wrote:
      > The closest ive come to any of this is object morphing with same vertex
      > count objects, and ones that are fairly simple too.
      >
      > I would love to see this work, as a current project could really come to
      > life with anything learned from this. I also remember seeing someone's
      > webpage who frequents the list who did a human model in 3D that looked like
      > it was animated, but names escape me.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On May 31, 2007, at 10:34 PM, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      >
      > Many thanks for the explanation. All this being said, is there a particular
      > 3d modeler software that makes this transition less cumbersome than others?
      >
      > Also, I am just curious if anyone has already had a chance to actually
      > implement some of this?
      >
      > Best wishes,
      >
      > Ico
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com
      > [mailto:jitter-bounces@cycling74.com]
      > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 9:32 PM
      > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >
      > Here is how you could do it, but it is not trivial. That said it is
      > also not incredibly difficult. It will just take some time. What you
      > want to do is export your model and for each vertex export a list of
      > bones they are attached to along with a corresponding weighting
      > factor. Usually vertices will have 3 or 4 bones with the total weight
      > adding to 1. Once you have this, you will export your bone
      > orientations and positions which can be in a number of formats but
      > will eventually need to be converted to a 3x4 matrix (modelview matrix
      > without the last row). This data, sent to a skinning shader will
      > animate your mesh according to the underlying bone structure and it
      > will look good.
      >
      > As far as joints are concerned, you could model them in jit.gl.lua
      > with the ODE module. Just figure out who to setup the different joint
      > types in ODE and position them correctly, and the simulation should
      > take care of the rest.
      >
      > best,
      > wes
      >
      > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > None specific. I am wondering whether this can be used at all in Jitter
      > in
      > the first place. If this was possible, then my second questions was your
      > first one ;-).
      >
      > Ico
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: jitter-bounces@cycling74.com [mailto:jitter-
      > bounces@cycling74.com]
      >
      > On Behalf Of Wesley Smith
      > Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2007 6:23 PM
      > Subject: Re: [jitter] importing 3d objects with joints
      >
      > What format is the joint data in?
      >
      > wes
      >
      > On 5/31/07, Ivica Ico Bukvic wrote:
      > Hi all,
      >
      > Is there a way to import 3d objects with joints into Jitter and if
      > so,
      >
      > is it
      > possible to address each joint separately in order to simulate
      > physics?
      >
      >
      > Many thanks!
      >
      > Ivica Ico Bukvic, D.M.A.
      > Composition, Music Technology, CCTAD, CHCI
      > Virginia Tech
      > Dept. of Music - 0240
      > Blacksburg, VA 24061
      > (540) 231-1137
      > (540) 231-5034 (fax)
      > ico@vt.edu
      > http://www.music.vt.edu/people/faculty/bukvic/
      > http://ico.bukvic.net
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > v a d e //
      >
      > www.vade.info
      > abstrakt.vade.info
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >