58 Posts tagged with "live"

  • My Perspective on Integrating Max and Live

    David Zicarelli gives some insight on the decision to integrate Max within Live...


  • Announcing Max for Live

    Cycling '74 and Ableton today announced Max for Live, the integration of Cycling '74's Max/MSP environment into Ableton Live. Available as an add-on product to Ableton's newly announced Live 8, Max for Live permits users to create devices that extend and customize Live by creating instruments, controllers, audio effects, and MIDI processors.


  • The Video Processing System, Part 1

    Between the tutorials, Jitter Recipes, and all of the example content, there are many Jitter patches floating around that each do one thing pretty well, but very few of them give a sense of how to scale up into a more complex system. Inspired by a recent patching project and Darwin Grosse's guitar processing articles, this series of tutorials will present a Jitter-based live video processing system using simple reusable modules, a consistent control interface, and optimized GPU-based processes wherever possible. The purpose of these articles is to provide an over-the-shoulder view of my creative process in building more complex Jitter patches for video processing.


  • Max 5 Guitar Processor, Part 3

    In the last article, we added some basic tonal effects: distortion/overdrive and EQ/filtering. This time, we will expand our virtual effects rack to include both a phase shifter and a full-featured modulating digital delay. As we add these effects, you will begin to see why a DIY effects system can trump any commercial product.


  • An Interview with Mattijs Kneppers

    These days it seems that everyone wants to be an artist so I found it refreshing to meet someone who see himself as an engineer that wanted to create tools for artists. Mattijs Kneppers spoke to me by phone from his home in Holland.


  • A Look Back at AES 2008 in San Francisco

    We rolled out of bed and into our suits this weekend to attend the annual Audio Engineering Society (AES) conference at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, a mere 5 blocks from our SOMA office. We occupied a small piece of real estate in the shadow of the big Mackie booth, and directly across from a booth featuring big reels of magnetic tape.


  • Announcing Expo ’74

    Cycling '74 today announced that its first user conference, Expo '74, will be held in San Francisco next April. The conference will include presentations, installations, workshops, and collaborative events covering the company's Max/MSP/Jitter software. Details will be outlined on the conference web site (expo74.net) in the coming months.


  • Announcing Expo ’74: Our First User Conference

    I'm pleased to announce that Cycling '74 will be hosting its first user conference next year, Expo '74. The conference will run three days from April 22-24, 2009 and will be held at the new (and intensely colored) Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I'd like to tell you why we decided to put on this event and what you can expect to happen if you attend...


  • An Interview with Hans Tammen – Endangered Guitar

    In this interview, Hans Tammen describes his journey into 'Endangered Guitar'...


  • It's great to see the way that Max/MSP crosses musical genres and also allows people to repurpose available (and maybe not so available) technology. Owen Grace has a band called The Guitar Zeros. He took the guitar controllers used for the Guitar Hero video games and wrote a Max/MSP patch interface that allows him utilize them as an expressive and innovative, stand alone instrument. The Guitar Zeros band currently has four players, a guitar controller player, a bass controller player, a 'real' drummer and a vocalist.


  • Email to Customers (April 24, 2008)

    Hello from Cycling '74 headquarters. We have some big news. Max 5 is now available for download. We're very excited about this major upgrade and we hope you will be too. This upgrade represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. Finally, we are offering a new Max/MSP/Jitter Workshop for Beginners in London. For complete details, please visit our Workshop page...


  • Cycling ’74 Releases Max/MSP Version 5

    Cycling ’74 today released Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.


  • An Interview with Natasha Barrett of DR.OX

    Some of us listen to many different types of music and are open to experimentation but, correct me if I'm wrong, sometimes the music that comes out of academic circles can be cold and dry. DR.OX is a welcome change. I had the pleasure of interviewing one half of DR.OX, Natasha Barrett, and I found her focused, enlightened and outspoken.


  • A Video and Text Interview with Monome

    Brian Crabtree (who performs under the name tehn) and his partner Kelli Cain are collectively known as monome. They design what they call adaptable, minimalist interfaces. The musical instrument industry calls them alternate controllers. There are currently three models that interface with a computer. There is no hard-wired functionality; interaction between the keys and lights is determined by the application (such as Max/MSP) running on the computer. Basically the monome units can do whatever you program them to do and serve as alternate controllers for not just music but games, lights, video etc. Monome is fantastically successful. I found their story inspiring and exciting -- they represent a new breed of creative entrepreneurs who are environmentally and socially conscious.


  • Making Connections: Building a USB Footswitch

    As a guitarist, I was looking for a simple hands-free controller for Max. Rather than buy an expensive pedalboard and MIDI interface, I decided to build a simple USB footswitch. It’s ridiculously easy to make and costs less than fifty bucks. Here is what you will need to do...


  • Announcing Max/MSP Version 5

    Cycling '74 today announced Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.


  • An Interview with Vlad Spears

    Daevlmakr sells a suite of plug-ins created in Max/MSP. I was able to spend a lot of time with Vlad Spears for this interview because he lives nearby in San Francisco...


  • Interview with Leafcutter John, Musician

    I spent hours and hours agonizing over an introduction to this interview. Everything I wrote sucked and realized that I have to let him speak for himself. I think Leafcutter John is brilliant. I love his music which I have been listening to over and over. It is extraordinary, and I'm enthralled with his Max patches, which are amazing artworks in themselves. We had a series of wonderful and fun conversations over a series of weeks...


  • My Wii Life…

    In this article, Darwin Grosse explains how to use the Wii video-game controller to interface with Max/MSP.


  • Q & A with Amoebazoid

    Zuckung from Amoebazoid is the newest c74 music release. Take a quick look at what Amoebazoid, himself, has to say about his new album.


  • I first became aware of Luke DuBois when I heard his band’s CD Freight Elevator Quartet. Later, we met when he did custom MSP programming for the filmmaker Toni Dove. I was intrigued by the contrast of his knowledge and experience vs. his boyish demeanor. Luke DuBois might look like a college student but that impression changes the minute he opens his mouth. He is a Fellow at the Computer Music Center at Columbia University in New York City and teaches at NYU. Luke is an expert with Max/MSP/Jitter and the intersection of music and image interaction.


  • The Seoul International Computer Music Festival (SICMF) is a yearly event sponsored by the Korean Electro-Acoustic Music Society (KEAMS). Richard Dudas gives us an in-depth look at the event.


  • Getting Around in Radial

    I've been asked to write a couple of articles that discuss how I learned radiaL, and how I approach using it in a live performance setting -- both as a soloist and in an ensemble setting. While there are a good number of people out there who use radiaL, I'm surprised to discover that there are not nearly as many people who do what I do -- namely, to walk out on a stage, launch the program, and start improvising. While it seems a perfectly natural thing to do from my point of view, it may not necessarily be clear how I learned radiaL and came to my current performance practice (In addition to Voiceband Jilt, my release for c74 records, you can also find some downloadable examples of my work on my downloads page and some online release material from the label Palace of Lights).


  • We Missed You In New Orleans

    This last week saw several Cycling '74 folks leaving behind their solitary monastic cells and journeying to the great city of N'awlins [New Orleans, to the rest of you] for the 2006 ICMC computer music conference and festival. Although no words will suffice to describe what remains after Katrina's passing, the dignity and pride of the inhabitants or the Big Easy, or the warm welcome from Tae Hong Park and the fine folks at Tulane, here's a modest report on what we saw and heard (and ate).


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