17 Posts tagged with "OSC"

  • Content You Need: A Visit to CNMAT

    Sometimes the "content you need" is a tackle box full of lures for specific situations – computer vision and great toolboxes for physical modeling Max externals, for example. This time, I want to remind you about something you might already have: the CNMAT tools. Most of the time, Max users who’ve visited the CNMAT website at UC-Berkeley are looking for the Max OSC (Open Sound Control) objects because they want to move data between sensors and actuators or talk to their or Apple or Android mobile devices. Or sometimes people have wandered over looking for a copy of Tristan Jehan’s analyzer~ object [think of it as the fiddle~ object with racing stripes, spinners, and an LED-illuminated undercarriage]. What? You don't have 'em yet? No worries - click here and click on the CNMAT Max/MSP Externals for Mac link.


  • IANNIX is a graphical free software sequencer, based on the work of Iannis Xenakis, that is programmable with javascript, speaks OSC, and is available for multiple platforms.


  • An Interview with Tarik Barri

    An innovative young artist based in Holland.


  • Jitter Video Puzzle


  • pMix / int.lib

    pMix (short for preset mixer) is a composition and performance tool that facilitates the control of multiple plugin parameters using an intuitive graphical interface.


  • A Look Back at NIME 2009

    I will try to summarize here what I thought were some of the highlights of NIME 2009...


  • Jitter on the Mainstage at Coachella

    On the afternoon of April 3rd, I received an email from M.I.A.'s manager asking if I'd be interested in working with them on a one-off show on the mainstage at Coachella that would feature live video processing... Upon reflecting, I would also like to share a couple of valuable lessons I learned working on this production...


  • An Interview with Keith McMillen

    Keith McMillen Instruments recently impressed all of us at NAMM with demonstrations of a new pair of string performance devices, the K-Bow and StringPort, both of which include some very rich software applications written in MaxMSP. The K-Bow, a bluetooth-based wireless gestural controller integrated into a violin bow, has just started shipping so we thought it would be a good time to catch up with Keith and find out more about the project. I met Keith at his studio...


  • The 2009 NAMM Show

    I recently attended Winter NAMM 2009 in Anaheim,CA, where Cycling '74 was sharing booth space with our friends at Ableton. I arrived on Friday afternoon, well after we had released our product announcement for Max for Live, and was impressed by the volume of booth traffic we were getting. Ableton had, of course, also announced their new Akai controller and Live 8 in addition to Max for Live, so there was a great deal of buzz surrounding our area of the show...


  • Announcing Expo ’74

    Cycling '74 today announced that its first user conference, Expo '74, will be held in San Francisco next April. The conference will include presentations, installations, workshops, and collaborative events covering the company's Max/MSP/Jitter software. Details will be outlined on the conference web site (expo74.net) in the coming months.


  • Announcing Expo ’74: Our First User Conference

    I'm pleased to announce that Cycling '74 will be hosting its first user conference next year, Expo '74. The conference will run three days from April 22-24, 2009 and will be held at the new (and intensely colored) Mission Bay Conference Center in San Francisco. I'd like to tell you why we decided to put on this event and what you can expect to happen if you attend...


  • Email to Customers (April 24, 2008)

    Hello from Cycling '74 headquarters. We have some big news. Max 5 is now available for download. We're very excited about this major upgrade and we hope you will be too. This upgrade represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. Finally, we are offering a new Max/MSP/Jitter Workshop for Beginners in London. For complete details, please visit our Workshop page...


  • A Look Back at Maker Faire 2008

    This year, we decided to set up shop at the 3rd annual Bay Area Maker Faire in San Mateo, CA. Last year, Cycling '74 shared a little corner of a booth with the nice people at MakingThings, and that was enough to get us hooked on this crazy annual celebration of all things DIY and electrified.


  • Cycling ’74 Releases Max/MSP Version 5

    Cycling ’74 today released Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.


  • A Video and Text Interview with Monome

    Brian Crabtree (who performs under the name tehn) and his partner Kelli Cain are collectively known as monome. They design what they call adaptable, minimalist interfaces. The musical instrument industry calls them alternate controllers. There are currently three models that interface with a computer. There is no hard-wired functionality; interaction between the keys and lights is determined by the application (such as Max/MSP) running on the computer. Basically the monome units can do whatever you program them to do and serve as alternate controllers for not just music but games, lights, video etc. Monome is fantastically successful. I found their story inspiring and exciting -- they represent a new breed of creative entrepreneurs who are environmentally and socially conscious.


  • Announcing Max/MSP Version 5

    Cycling '74 today announced Version 5.0 of its Max/MSP media development tools. This version represents a new era of Max programming, with a completely redesigned multi-processing kernel and a streamlined development environment built on a platform-independent foundation. With a new patcher interface, searchable database of objects and examples, integrated documentation and new tutorials, the new Max user will find a smoother learning curve while experienced users will see improved productivity.


  • Multi-language Max/MSP

    This is perhaps an unusual article for Cycling '74 to put on their web site, because it has to do with all the languages that Max/MSP isn't. I have to confess that I'm not really a very good Max-user. I know only a handful of objects, and I am of the text-based generation that is still a little, um, "graphical-user-interface-challenged". I basically use Max/MSP only as a window onto computer music languages that I am adept at using. More and more, though, I am also using Max as base platform for connecting these languages to each other. One of the really great decisions that the Cycling '74 design team made was to make the development and integration of external objects relatively easy. This has been a real boost for the classes that I teach at Columbia University, and it has also allowed me much more creative freedom in my compositional work.


  • Cycling '74 today demonstrated the recently released version 1.5 software for JazzMutant Lemur control surface. The update is available via download to all current Lemur customers. New software features in version 1.5 allow the Lemur to control many popular DAWs including Logic, Digital Performer, Live and Cubase.


  • MIDI and the Lemur

    The JazzMutant Lemur is an incredibly versatile control surface for media applications. It allows you to create an interface match your performance needs, and communicates with your computer through an Ethernet connection (using the Open Sound Control messaging system). Unfortunately, there are relatively few software packages that speak OSC natively, so “bridge” software has been required to interface between OSC and the more common MIDI communication path.


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