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Do I get a PowerBook or MacBook to create and run externals?

July 18, 2008 | 12:36 am

I am planning on buying a Mac laptop and learning to write my own Pd and Max/MSP externals in C and C++. I don’t know if I should get a PowerBook or a MacBook. I have read the following tutorials in helping myself determine which to get.

http://209.85.141.104/search?q=cache:k7MeBqDj7VMJ:gurnig.com/asset/pdf/IntroductionToWritingExternsInC.pdf+An+Introduction+to+Writing+Externs+in+C+for+Max/MSP&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us&client=firefox-a

pdstatic.iem.at/externals-HOWTO/

http://www.cycling74.com/story/2005/10/5/82341/3928

http://www.cycling74.com/twiki/bin/view/ProductDocumentation/MaxUBSDK

The last tutorial discusses how to write and compile Max/MSP and Pd code on an Intel processor. My big question is this. Do these procedures for creating and compiling and running Max/MSP and Pd code work on a MacBook, or am I better off buying a PowerBook, and using Xcode there? (PPC Max/MSP & Pd external code seems to be the standard from what I have seen on the net these days, even though PowerMacs are no longer being manufactured.) Plus, if I get a MacBook, is there an alternative to using Flext in the process of code creation and execution. I say this because Flext doesn’t work on non PPC Macs unless you get CodeWarrior, and CodeWarrior programs will become harder to use as OSX updates their software. If any of you could get back to me on this asap I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you for your time,
David


July 18, 2008 | 6:56 am

I would suggest going for an Intel otherwise you’re going to be one step behind all along. e.g., I understand that PPC will not be supported in the next Mac OS (10.6). Codewarrior is not really supported either. And (obviously) Intels are faster.

Not sure about flext specifically but you can certainly build Max and pd externals in Xcode for Intel and PPC. The basic APIs for Max and pd and are similar so you wouldn’t _need_ flext for compiling an external for both platforms but it does take care of some of the subtle differences and uses C++.


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